Kaiser Willys Jeep Parts
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Thread: well, the darn thing is out

  1. #181
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    going in.jpgengine in1.jpgengine in2.jpg

    motor and frame now one!!! engine is in!! think i will name this thing busted gut or BG for short, tuff stuff when alone and there is a little ramp to go into garage and that made it tough, used a come long to get up ramp

  2. #182
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    Excellent work. She is really coming together.

  3. #183
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    i bet that darn motor and trans weighs more than two of modern 4 cyl,,, heavy heavy heavy. Years ago i had to rebuild a chevy vega, crappy little car with a mis match engine, steel block but aluminum head, but the point of this is, i could actually pick up the block and lift it out of the car. I am not sure that two grown strong men with a lifting bar and block chained to it could lift the engine and Xfer case of a m38a1... My engine hoist did it no problem but moving it (hoist and all) was not easy, probably because of little wheels on hoist, but non the less it was not easy and now i will lift the other engine out of the spare m38a1 and put it on the skid that i have....
    Did something today that have never done, used one of those thread kits to rethread the rocker arm that holds the stud that keeps the valve cover from leaking, mine was pretty bad, took rocker arm off and recut threads and inserted new threads and re installed rocker arm (after blowing out all the pieces and parts with air) now the darn thing wont leak.... i know could have bought a new one but wth rather fix than buy
    Last edited by pelago; 11-12-2017 at 09:14 PM.

  4. #184
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    These engines/transmissions/transfer case were made with good American steel/cast iron. They are heavy, but they last forever. Once a pon a time, I had friends that raced the local dirt track circuit. We raced in the Sportsman division, so we used a 355 SBC, with a 525 lift cam. We did have a spare engine, but we used it in the truck used to pull the car to the track. The spare utilized all the same hook ups that the race car did, minus the transmission. The season championship night came, and we went out for the heat race. The engine in the car developed a head gasket leak, and was down on power. We decided to perform an engine swap before the feature race. Four of us attacked the car and the truck at the same time, for the engine swap. Two of us prepped the truck for the removal, and two on the car. We took two floor jack handles, and made a cradle to lift the engine out. Two guys per side lifted the engine out of the car, and set it on the trailer. Then we went and pulled the engine of the truck. The truck was much more difficult, because of the height of the truck compared to the car. We were able to set the engine in, plumb it, and have it running within an hour. We made it out on the track and placed third in the feature. The only problem was that we had to put the original wounded engine in the truck, just to get home. It was a long night.

  5. #185
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    . In a related story, we were preparing mid week to run a 100 lap memorial race, that had a descent pay out. We were prepping the engine for the race, and found an issue with the passenger side head. We looked under the bench for our stash of engine parts and only found a one ported passenger side 305 head. We were in crunch time by this point, so it was decided to go for broke, and install the 305 head. The budget was already gone through with shock and tire purchases, so there was no more money left, or enough time to prep a new head. We assembled the engine, then loaded up the car. We pushed the car to the weigh scale, and opted out of the mud laps. The first start of the car was when we went to the heat race. The engine sounded odd, but ran with plenty of power. Since we didn't go out for mud laps, we had to start at the rear of the field. He quickly weaved his way through the crowd of 10 cars, within the 10 laps. As soon as the checkered flag dropped, he shut down the engine, and was pushed into the pit. We went through and adjusted the valves with it hot, and then let it rest until the feature. For the last race, we started at the mid pack, outside row. When the green flag was dropped, the car took off again. He quickly ran toward the front, and maintained a sizable lead. Over the coarse of the race, the engine did fine. Towards the end of the race, the engine started to puff a bit out of the right side header, when the throttle was released. The longer the race went on, the more the passenger side head was smoking. The lead was starting to diminish, but by the time the checkered flag, the second place car was hot on his heals. He was able to hold them off, and win the race. When we tore down the engine, the passenger bank piston rings were pretty much burnt up, and the crank bearings showed much more wear than the left bank. The difference in compression between the two sides, made the engine unbalanced. It was a good test of theory, with an interesting outcome.

  6. #186
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    An engine hoist is worth its weight in gold. I use mine for way more than it was designed for. Pulling bodies off the frame are a snap with an engine hoist. I work alone, so I use it to make up for a second set of hands.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #187
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    . In a related story, neat..

  8. #188
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    now here is one that i just dont undestane,,, right hand thread for right tire, and left turn thread for left tire. Never had to change a flat or repair a tire under fire, but can imagine crap coming down at 40-50 a hour, and you are trying in the middle of the night to change a tire?? wonder who the rocket scientist was that figured two different lugs and two different stubs for tires?? just can not understand the reasoning behind this.. plus twice the stock numbers and twice the inventory and i can not a glance tell if it is right hand thread or left hand thread????
    new topic, pulled the spare engine out of the other M38A1 now sitting on a cradle, plan is to rebuild it from crank on up. new jugs, rings, bearings valve job, dip the block and this time i am going to paint the sucker BRIGHT FREAKIN RED

  9. #189
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    SOMEONE REFRESH MY MEMORY HERE.... 24vdc thru a switch to input on distributor switch on and hit starter and it starts?? all things being equal, fuel so forth??

  10. #190
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    If I remember history correctly, left handed threads on the driver's side of vehicles can trace it's beginnings to horse drawn wagon days. The direction of travel would prevent the hubs from loosening up. That was the standard through the early sixties, on some vehicles. Years ago, I started a collection of left handed lug nuts. There is no way to tell them apart without examining the threads. At least the studs have an L on the end of them. Both my wagon and CJ2A have mixed and matched studs on the left side. Each stud has to be looked at, when removing a wheel. What a pain in the rear. When I get the notion, I will change them all out. Now with that being said, will I change the left side to left handed thread? Depends on my mood. I doubt there are too many wheel thieves, that are out looking for steel Jeep wheels.

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