Kaiser Willys Jeep Parts
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Thread: well, the darn thing is out

  1. #91
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    Damn if i didnt wring another stud off!! takes so long to remove busted stud, have to dril it, and with small cold chisel worry it to pieces and then suck it out with shop vac. then when putting on the darn oil filter holder the stud that was on the piece that the whole thing bolts too well, i could not get a nut started on it, and had to take that off, and then grind the (welded bolt head off back) thing to where i could put another fresh bolt in there and weld it. carb linkage on, carb installed. oil lines ordered. decided to match the color of the same oil filter holder that Kaiser sells... and what the heck painted fhe fan same color (had to get busted bolt out of pulley base also. starter, generator, volt reg, fuel lines (jury rig), then see if it will sputter a bit
    getting there.jpg
    also wish that they engineers stuck with same size bolts and threads all the way thru. the bolts holding the oil filter stand used 1"X1/4" fine threads, changed them to #8 1 1/4" X 1/4 bolts and nuts, with washers.. put the fan on with stainless bolts (why not)

  2. #92
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    UNANTICIPATED ISSUE CAME UP.... I am planning on staying with 24VDC I have two 24VDC starters, 2 24VDC regulators, but only one 24VDC generator. Here is the rub, I can remember polarizing voltage regulators, but damn if i can remember how we did it?? I would like to check out starters, I know that all that is needed is to hold them down and kick them with 24VDC and they will either just sit there or fire up. the generator is a different story, have watched battery/gen/alt and starter repair shops just put them in a jig with large electric motor with a fan belt and turn motor on and read the output. Here in Jacksonville NC there is a fine rebuild shop and i have used them for repairing and ordering pieces and parts for my cruising sailboat. However he does not want to touch either starter, reg, generator??? says he does not have nor can get parts. I told him that i was not having him repair them i just want them OP checked, he just does not want to do it. have called every shop within 100 miles (that i could find) no one want to do it???

  3. #93
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    "I can remember polarizing voltage regulators, but damn if i can remember how we did it?"

    Memory is the second thing to go. I can't remember the first - that's probably merciful. I don't remember how either.

    Mr. Google says the M38A1 regulator is a three relay Autolite regulator in a funny breadbox. If the regulator has been used, it is probably OK in that it will retain enough residual magnetism to start up in the right state. Google "M38A1 Voltage Regulator" and you will find folks with instructions on how to reset charge voltages and such.

    My new regulator didn't have a polarizing label on it - it just went in. (Oh yeah, we replaced that skinny battery cable pretty quickly...)

    A quick GO/NO-GO for the generator isn't too hard. There is probably enough residual magnetism in the iron to give a couple of volts if you just spin it and look at the armature (output) terminal, but a little better check just takes one more item.

    The Generator is a three terminal Field, Armature and Ground machine, no funky series-compound traction motor/generator device. Once again, Mr. Google will show you which terminal is which. Use a 6-volt lantern battery to excite the field coil. NOT A SIX VOLT VEHICLE BATTERY - TOO MUCH CURRENT CAPACITY! You know that, but that's for the other folks reading this...

    Get your big air wrench, drill or whatever and just spin the nut on the drive pulley. Read the Armature voltage with the field coil excited. Volts means it's working. You probably won't get it all the way up to 24-volts, but it will give you a hint. Maybe even build your own electric motor jig ...

    Give brushes and commutators a good looking over. Grease bearings and bushings. And, as we found out - they're old and they may work for a while then quit...

    "ld like to check out starters, I know that all that is needed is to hold them down and kick them with 24VDC and they will either just sit there or fire up."

    For the starter - you're right; tie it down tight, add juice and hold on!
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  4. #94
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    M38A1 Generator and Regulator Answers

    Read These:

    http://g503.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=9497

    https://g503.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=91074

    In the regulator - check rectifier (forward-reverse ratio/short/open) and capacitor for short

    Look at the picture: On the Generator cable connector:

    A and C are the "Hot" terminals.

    C is the Field.

    Case is Ground.

    Don't let the magic smoke out of the boxes and parts
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  5. #95
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    GREAT, AND THANK YOU, BOOKMARKED AND PRINTED SAME. difference in models?? years?? branch of service?? in as much as i have two M38A1. been comparing them piece by piece. one interesting note, the mount and platform for the voltage regulator is somewhat different on the two, one is a flat stamped piece of metal that is more dirt shield than anything else and that is on the 1952 one, the other machine has shock mounted brackets on top of the shield, two flat pieces of !"X1/4" steel with shock mounts and a ground strap on two of the posts, the two pieces of steel are offset some and have studs tapped into them with rubber shock mounts. hmmmmm maybe someone found out something. but i intend to use the same principle on the rebuild. i have some thick nylon backed scrap and will cut out a 1"1/4" square (four of them drill them and use them to replace the dried out ones i have. wont be quite as high as the original but should do same job

  6. #96
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    OKAY, ANOTHER QUESTION....
    as most know i have two M38A1's for pieces and parts. the one built in 1952 has some differences with the other one, not sure when it was built but probably later. The voltage regulator on the 1952 model has small rubber shock absorbers on all four points where the regulator mounts on the plate that is attached to the frame. the later one does not? now did some engineer feel that the regulator has to be protected from shock? the little pieces of rubber (they look like a spool that thread could go on if it were wood) are pretty well shot. now i do in my junk pile have some nylon backed by rubber that i can cut and shape to make new ones. 1" thick rubber and nylon. comments?

  7. #97
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    I went out and peeked under the hood of the '48 - and then looked in the old parts box as well. All three of the regulators I have are hard mounted - just a metal plate that bolts to the fire wall. I faintly (and maybe inaccurately) remember a vibration isolated mount on some vehicle in my past - it could have been the '50 Dodge though.

    Now, were those rubber isolators possibly electrical isolation? The circuit breaker relay and the voltage regulator relay show internal connections to the case. I would strongly suspect that these were meant to be chassis negative (ground) returns). If the case has rubber isolators, how is the ground return handled?

    Unless they are there for some electrical reason, I suspect they were examples of overengineering.

  8. #98
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    Unless they are there for some electrical reason, I suspect they were examples of overengineering. ... two of the shock mounts had typical wire braid conductors to ground, have kept those and they are actually ingood shape, and yes the thing has to be connected to solid groundreconditoned voltage reg.jpgreconditoned voltage reg.jpg. not in photo but the base plate and shield actually metal wise okay, cleaned and painted

  9. #99
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    In another life I did a a lot of work isolating electronics from shock and vibration. That regulator uses three relays which depend on points opening and closing at the right time to do its job. As we know, M38's get vibrated a lot (think bi-directional tires on a hard road) and shocked and bounced a lot ("Hey y'all - watch this...).

    Vibration and shock could (and I stress could) make points open and close at the wrong time, so someone could overthink things and make that shock isolated mount. Soft rubber bobbins isolate from high frequency vibration. Harder rubber isolates from shock. A soft rubber bobbin that's aged and hardened changes from a vibration isolator to an shock isolator.

    It looks like your little rubber isolators will do a good job - and the wire braid answers our other question about negative chassis return.

    Carry on.

  10. #100
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    What a pain this was,,, so so so frozen, did not want to beat it to death, having control of clutch and brakes kinda important, but got it apart and cleaned, no slop in the movement so should be okaybrake and cluthc assy.jpg took a whole bottle of propane to heat it up enough to disassemble

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