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Thread: well, the darn thing is out

  1. #151
    Senior Member pelago's Avatar
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    Am about 1/2 dozen needed parts to drop engine into the frame, some clutch parts and clutch linkage

  2. #152
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    Years ago, working in a Ford tractor shop, we used to rebuild in house all of the starters and generators. Then the parts became hard to get through the Ford network. Now, all you can do is take it to a shop and they have to get aftermarket parts and brushes. Moral of the story, we used to rebuild everything, but being a throw away society, we are left with fewer choices. The cost to do things ourselves, often times outweighs the worth of the part. I checked to see what a local machine shop would charge to sleeve a wheel cylinder, and bore it to size. They estimated $85.... Then asked why would you want to use an old part.

  3. #153
    Senior Member pelago's Avatar
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    AGREE, TOO MUCH TOSSED. but this old critter getting new face with old parts. many cases even the original bolts and nuts, however on stress items got new bolts like holding pressure plate to flywheel those were new #8's

  4. #154
    Senior Member pelago's Avatar
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    oil plug.jpg curious, one would think that this plug is for 90wt gear oil, but when i opened it and stuck finger in there it was grease???

  5. #155
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    I'm not all that familiar with the 4WD Jeeps, but a while back when I was looking somewhere, there was an extended discussion about lubricant for steering knuckles - which is what I think that picture shows.

    (If it's not ... ???)

    The discussion described a concoction they called "knuckle pudding" - a mixture of a heavy oil (90W130?) and a grease. The gist of the discussion was that things need something of a consistency between heavy oil and grease.

    Start here for more than you want to know:

    https://cj3b.info/Tech/SteeringKnuckles.html

  6. #156
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    Jax: You might check out John Deere, they make a lubricant called Special-Purpose Corn Head Gun Grease -- AN102562.

    SPM1US: My .02 is for the John Deere Corn Head grease. It is designed to lubricate the knuckle bearings, not the wheel bearings, and contains "Moly" (Molybdendum Disulphide) which is a superior additive for extreme pressure and anti-wear. The 14 oz tubes can be had for less than $4 last I bought them, delivered to your door or go visit your local JD dealer. The viscosity of the Corn Head grease works quite well in the closed knuckle application.

    Frank: The characteristic of both the 0 and 00 "liquid grease" or "fluid grease" is what is called thixotropic. The lubricant is gelatinous until agitated, or stirred. The John Deere Corn Head fluid grease is a similar product used in corn harvesting equipment. It has the same thixotropic properties.

    One of the reasons this stuff stays in the closed steering knuckles is that it liquifies where the universal joint spins in it. It is thrown upwards to the upper steering knuckle bearing and the lower bearing is immersed in it. The movement of knuckle steering back and forth forced the liquified grease through the bushing into the hub and the wheel bearings, lubricating them as well as any 70 to 140 wt gear lube could.

    But where it is not agitated much around the seals it maintains more of a, here is that word again, "pudding" consistency. It wets the ball enough to provide the sliding wipe of the rubber seal keeping the ball surfacing from wearing excessively and keeping the grit wiped away. But, it doesn't run out of seams and minor wear gaps like the honey consistency of the straight gear lubes.

  7. #157
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    The John Deere corn head grease is good stuff, although I never thought about putting it in the closed knuckles. Learn something new every day. Thank you for the tip.

  8. #158
    Senior Member pelago's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarrBeard View Post
    Jax: You might check out John Deere, they make a lubricant called Special-Purpose Corn Head Gun Grease -- AN102562.

    SPM1US: My .02 is for the John Deere Corn Head grease. It is designed to lubricate the knuckle bearings, not the wheel bearings, and contains "Moly" (Molybdendum Disulphide) which is a superior additive for extreme pressure and anti-wear. The 14 oz tubes can be had for less than $4 last I bought them, delivered to your door or go visit your local JD dealer. The viscosity of the Corn Head grease works quite well in the closed knuckle application.

    Frank: The characteristic of both the 0 and 00 "liquid grease" or "fluid grease" is what is called thixotropic. The lubricant is gelatinous until agitated, or stirred. The John Deere Corn Head fluid grease is a similar product used in corn harvesting equipment. It has the same thixotropic properties.

    One of the reasons this stuff stays in the closed steering knuckles is that it liquifies where the universal joint spins in it. It is thrown upwards to the upper steering knuckle bearing and the lower bearing is immersed in it. The movement of knuckle steering back and forth forced the liquified grease through the bushing into the hub and the wheel bearings, lubricating them as well as any 70 to 140 wt gear lube could.

    But where it is not agitated much around the seals it maintains more of a, here is that word again, "pudding" consistency. It wets the ball enough to provide the sliding wipe of the rubber seal keeping the ball surfacing from wearing excessively and keeping the grit wiped away. But, it doesn't run out of seams and minor wear gaps like the honey consistency of the straight gear lubes.
    KNEW NONE OF THIS!! Have a john deere place here in town will get some and make sure the knuckle is well lubricated. learn something new every day
    got new rubber boots/ball joint cover and installed same, all ball joints are pretty damn tight and in some cases put new grease fittings on, but all lubricated and can manully turn the wheels using the arm only,,, little stiff but that is good

  9. #159
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    I'd guess between you, me and gmwillys - we have close to 200 years of skinned knuckles and talkin' (cussin' at) old Jeeps in our background - and we all have something to learn!

  10. #160
    Senior Member pelago's Avatar
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    one thing i have to question, is to do a clutch job seems like one would have to pull the entire power plant out., say a bad throwout bearing or a actual clutch disk. seems lot of work to do this,,,, but never have done it, and it might actually be the easiest way, considering the floor actually prevents the "pulling back the bell housing and tranny". just a observation Ordering the clutch bellcrank system/kit and the throw out bearing and the return spring and the clutch release bearing sleeve , already have the "Y" that is the fulcrum..... THEN I CAN MOUNT THIS PUPPY ON THE FRAME!!! AND JUST NOT TOO FAR AWAY FROM HEARING EXHAUST. Looking forward to hearing it run and letting it get to temperature and then run for 20 minutes or so and draining oil and filter and refill with new 30wt. Additives to the oil?? I rebuilt a Kubota diesel for my sailboat, was a simple 4cyl diesel and i had a incredible maintenance shop manual. explained everything and had pictorial of each remove/install for the whole thing... had engine dipped and miked at a performance machine shop and found that needed to go up in piston size. same rods but new pistons, new bearings after crank turned and a valve job. I ran this diesel for 10,000 hours and when i sold the boat (cried) the prospective owner wanted a compression check before giving me cash dollars. said no problem but suggest that a independant mechanic do it so that there could be no conflict, and that would put any issue to bed. when i put this thing together, i did a cmp test and wrote the results in my maint manual handed the manual to the mechanic to write new readings on each jug, and this guy was astonished, the engine had not lost ANY compression ..... Mechanic asked me about oil changes and i said every 100 hours drain and refill with URSA 30wt 5 quarts and a quart of marvel mystery oil. and of course new filter, and all of that was in mylog books and they were open to read. ( i kept them, my boat, my memories, my logs).. but that key fact 100 hrs and change for 10,000 hours is a lot of oil sure, but that is the key to long lasting life for a motor. running-1.jpgoriginal flags.jpgrunning-1.jpgPELAGO.JPG

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