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Thread: well, the darn thing is out

  1. #161
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    Yeah, if we want our things (toys and such) to last, we need to take care of them.

    Too bad we weren't that careful with ourselves.

    None of the manuals I've seen call for anything more exotic than 30W oil (in modern oil I've gone to 10W30). The F134 is a low compression, low speed engine that isn't worked as hard as your Kubota diesel. I really don't know if a magic synthetic oil is warranted.

    As for intervals - if we look at your 100 hour change interval - and guess that an M38A1 is going to average about 30 mph - we're at the 3000 mile oil change interval that seems to be pretty standard for us conservative people today. I do agree with your "run it until it gets good and hot, then change the oil" approach. There is stuff in there that is going to come out quickly - and some that will stay a lot longer. The partial flow oil filter will catch some, so dump it at the first change as well.

  2. #162
    Senior Member pelago's Avatar
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    DID SOMETHING!!! Knowing that at times going to have to get into the inspection port on the bell housing, and light and actually seeing what is going on means a lot, wth i painted the inside of the bell housing white. bakedit in the overn for three hours, pretty hard now.... why not, sure going to get some dust and crud, but seeing whats going on pretty important also Did that on my 1935 ford pick up and it worked

  3. #163
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    On an original engine, without a known maintenance history, a 30 wt. non detergent oil is recommended. Tractor Supply still offers it in a 2 gallon jug. The brand is Traveler oil, and goes for $20.00. After an engine is rebuilt, then one would be free to use whatever you want to use. A good synthetic would be my choice, just for the simple fact that the engine will go through periods of sitting. The synthetic is less likely to pull moisture from the environment. With your history of maintenance, your A1 will be in A1 shape.

    On changing a clutch in chassis, it is possible. On a M38A1, the transmission cover is twice the size of a civilian Jeep. With that being said, one would really hate themselves to perform a clutch change this way. By the time you unbolt the transmission from the engine, drop the cross member, and slide the transmission out. The engine would be out, and ready for close inspection. The nice thing about the early M38A1, is that the engine is easily pulled out as a assembly. The grill is hinged, making everything is accessible. Just one thing to keep in mind, when performing a clutch job, have the fly wheel surface ground. This will ensure that your clutch will live a long, trouble free life. As long as you keep up with adjustments from time to time. The adjustment procedure is covered under TM 9-8014 page 231 par. 191.

  4. #164
    Senior Member pelago's Avatar
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    ONE OTHER THING??? Gasoline, these things were made long before unleaded. They all used full bore lead in the gas, now would people advise a adiitve to supplant the lead problem. I had atomic four gas engine originally in my sailboat, old old style flathead four cylinder. did replace it with a kubota, but we got some kind of additive and damn if i can remember what it was.... and the grain fed gas, avoid it and go with 93 octane that is alcohol free or it is advertised as such??

  5. #165
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    Lead additive is the best route to take, unless you are having engine work done. A machine shop can install hardened valve seats, so that unleaded fuel can be used. The lead acted as a cushion between the valve and seat.
    The local parts stores do carry bottles of the lead additive, but good luck asking the kid behind the counter. They just look at you as if you were asking for their nose ring. Most of the time, the bottle is at the top of their additive/snake oil display, under a layer of dust.
    One of the local gas stations where I'm located, sells 100% 89 octane gasoline. I not only run it through my Heeps, but also through my small engines. The alcohol in the gas plays havoc with old carburetors. If the fuel is left in the bowl, the alcohol will corrode the aluminum, leaving a white goopy mess. Another thing to keep in mind, is that modern blended gasoline is only good for about two weeks. The alcohol content, (10%) breaks down the remaining 90% of gas to the point that the octane rating reduces, the longer it sits. Fuel stabilizers help to reduce the break down of the gasoline. As with your sailboat, when you switched to the Kubota diesel, the fuel is much more stable. The fuel is able to be stored for far longer, without the fuel breaking down.

  6. #166
    Senior Member pelago's Avatar
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    NEW HELP, NEW TOPIC....
    was able to obtain front drive shaft for front diff. and rear drive shaft, good price.. (compared to nearly 400.00) here is the rub. have no idea how to remove the old "U" joints. they have a retaining ring on outside and know that this will have to be removed on both sides. drive out with a old socket or a piece of bronze?? dont want to screw them up

    have never removed this type did see some random videos but not this kind, others had retaining ring on inside and were not quite this rusty, would think that they are driven out but starting opposit the grease fitting
    U JOINT 2.jpgU JOINT1.jpg

  7. #167
    Senior Member pelago's Avatar
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    new treasures. transmission, with trsansfer case and emergency brake, front drive shaft, and rear drive shaft, both taillights (broke them open and both looked brand new inside) (right and left) 24volt horn, one cat eye for front all for $450.00

  8. #168
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    A good soaking with PB Blaster will help. Needle nose pliers, a pick, a good vise, a larger diameter socket for the U-joint to go into, and a piece of steel or socket that fits inside of the U-joint bore. On these older drive shafts, the U-joint does come out rather easily using this method. A little bit of heat may be needed if they are stubborn. Most of the time, I end up using the stake pocket on my car trailer to set the drive shaft on. Then I use a steel punch that is slightly smaller than the I.D. of the U-joint bore. To me, steel works better because it transfers the force of the hammer blow more effectively. The shock that the steel delivers works to get things moving. I have a large diameter punch that plugs into my air hammer. This works well on the stubborn, rusted U-joints. The shafts are strong enough to withstand a large amount of force, so don't be afraid to put the hammer to the U-joint. When you drive the U-joint out, push towards the side without the grease zerk, (or remove it completely) this will give you just enough room to push the cap all the way through the outside of the drive shaft. Next turn the drive shaft over to the side that you started on, and drive the U-joint cross back through to push the cap out that side.

    When installing the new joint, start by running a piece of emery cloth through to clean up the bore. This will aid in installing the new joint. Next remove the caps from the new joints, and ensure that there is plenty of grease to help retain the needle bearings in place, just in case the cap falls off before installation. Place one of the snap rings into the bore, this will act as a stop for the cap when being installed. Then install one cap on the side you intend to install first. Place the cross in the drive shaft yoke, with the one cap on the inside of the bore. Install the remaining cap on the outside of the yoke, where the U-joint is sticking out. Drive or press the U-joint into place, until the cap comes into contact with the snap ring. Install the other snap ring on the opposing bore. Install grease zerk, and grease until the rubber seals start to expand. Grease does not need to be visible from the caps, to prevent grease from being thrown as you drive.

  9. #169
    Senior Member pelago's Avatar
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    OKAY, GONNA GIVE IT A SHOT!!! Was worried about gorping a 389.00 drive shaft

  10. #170
    Senior Member pelago's Avatar
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    throwoiut bearing, and fork.jpg

    inside bell housing, new throwout bearing bearing carrier, fork, and new return spring and cable

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