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Thread: well, the darn thing is out

  1. #901
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    I suppose it's been a while since I bought one. Seems awfully steep. You might have to use your other steering box for now. The only folks I know of that carry a sector shaft or a complete kit is Quarter Ton and Military;

    https://quartertonparts.com/product/...6-807478-g758/

    https://quartertonparts.com/product/...t-807478-g758/

  2. #902
    Senior Member pelago's Avatar
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    WELL, removed the steering box, drained 8 bucks worth of gear oil out, no did not try to save it. can i feel some wobble in the sector shaft, yeah a tiny tiny bit, just does not feel that worn. inspection of the sector shaft found minuscule wear, could not detect with a fingernail???? Am thinking, maybe incorrectly that the seal failed? crappy seal?? I know i had to get a better seal than the one that kaiser offered for the front end of the transmission?? I did notice that the kit offered by 1/4ton mentioned honing before installing, and i do have a hone for wheel cylinders that would do the job. a seal from napa 54.00 plus 9.00 shipping and state tax takes it to 70 bucks and for 40 more can get a kit? For piece of mind get the kit, and be done with it? and i could use the other ross box to be the one that is repaired, however i am uncomfortable taking a socket and trying to whack out the old bushings and then gorping p the new ones installing same way. feel that a machine shop or the same guy that pressed out the drive shafts for the new "U" joints would do it, he charged a whole ten bucks to finish what i was afraid to try. I will not have a steering box that leaks, nor will i put in grease that was suggested in another forum. mentioned that the steering box leaked and four guys said use grease, i replied to them that i took two ross boxes apart and found that the grease had all gathered in a dried mess and none of it was on the bearings all had moved to the inside walls of the box and all had dried to a horrible mess that i had to chisel out. They all indicated that they felt grease was better??? i am in total disagreement with that. engineers far better than i or them designed this damn thing for heavy wt liquid gear lub not grease. and a careful inspection sees that is designed to make the fluid flow up to bearings,, with the lower bearing submerged in lube all the time. the bushings in the sector shaft have curved cuts in them for lube flow, not grease. and damn if i am gonna do this right am gonna do this right.....


    \addendum.... just went to my guy and he said that he did not have the correct size for press, but recommended another shop , went there and it turned out that it was a specialty shop that builds hot rods, old school type and he said no problem and i am getting kit from 4wd guys
    Last edited by pelago; 10-24-2018 at 08:38 AM.

  3. #903
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    I am all for spending the extra money, and doing the job correctly. The honing of the bushings is a two part reason. 1st To match the sector shaft O.D. perfectly to the I.D. of the bushing. 2nd Take out any imperfections caused by installation. Quarter Ton and Military are a good group of guys, and they work hard to produce and offer the best parts around. They had the Ross kits and sector shafts made, because nobody offers the correct replacement parts.

  4. #904
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    Heavy weight gear oil is the way to go, and you called it exactly right for the reason why!

    Lots of steering gear boxes have a zerk fitting in place of the oil plug - because the seals leaked and whoever/whatever reason, the quick fix was used.

    Good seals and good gaskets don't leak. We did the job right (the second try) and so far I've not had enough oil seepage from either place to even keep the outside shiny.

    The cover bolts for the '48 use copper crush washers as added leak protection.

    On the truck adding oil is a real task because the "remote control gear shift mechanism" (three-on-the-tree) comes right over the top of the plug.

  5. #905
    Senior Member pelago's Avatar
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    interesting conversation with 4wd guy, he said hell with it use the same grease that goes in the front end , get from john deere and not use oil, that just goes against my grain, and that is complete real restoration. actually changed oil yesterday, was not bad maybe 25hours on it, and was sorta black, but warmed it up and pulled the plug. used straight 30wt to refill. changing the oil also affected the mechanical oil gauge. now after 1hr running it settled down to abt 28lbs and then hit accelerator and it goes to 40lbs. probably will be different when it is actually on the road

  6. #906
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    Oil Change

    A. get from john deere and not use oil,

    If you were going to use a grease, the John Deere corn head grease is probably the best bet. In one of the discussions folks got pretty technical about the grease in the steering knuckles. It has to have properties of both grease and oil - I don't pretend to remember the term they used. I do remember that it is also called "knuckle pudding"

    B. actually changed oil yesterday, was not bad maybe 25 hours on it, and was sorta black, but warmed it up and pulled the plug. used straight 30wt to refill.

    That was another good idea. After we rebuild/rework an engine that has been sitting for a long time, there are still areas that we can't get cleaned out. Crud sticks in passages and oil galleries and most of it comes out after 10 - 20 hours of running. Did you change the filter? That would be a good idea.

    Straight 30W, non-detergent is what the books call for. Multi viscosity (5W30) just won't stay in those old seals when it's at the 5W end and detergent oil cleans off stuff that needs to stay - some small amount of crud in the old seals does help keep things where they belong.

    Even the capillary tube for the oil gauge gets cleaned out after a bit. 28 PSI at idle and 40 PSI run is really nice. That engine sounds tight. You should be good until it's time to put it away next fall.

  7. #907
    Senior Member pelago's Avatar
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    Has anyone ever drained the oil out, then filled with kerosene and using starter only turned engine over to help eliminate built up crud. years ago, YEARS ago i bought a 1935 ford pick up from a farmer in ellison bay wisconsin for 40.00 us dollars, it was still in use on the farm and ran good, burnt oil like craxy. when i drove it home from ellison bay to chicago if you looked down route 83 you could see a blue cloud coming... had to stop at gas stations and get waste oil to fill crankcase up, sometimes damn starter would hang up and i would have to crawl underneath, and pull starter and push the gear back in,, I was doing this one time at a restuarant and this old guy came over and asked it i had a problem and i told him and he said "listen younger, all you have to do is put the truck in first gear and push i backwards, damn been pulling the starter all day. then i had a flat, not spare to speak of, another farmer came by on his tractor and offered to help, he pulled tire, we went back to his farm (right there) and pulled tube, fixed it and put it back on truck. then he asked i i wanted a job, said sure, so i bailed hay, and stacked it in the barn for three days. he paid me 50.00 dollars and fed me for three days. THIS IS OLD SCHOOL USA, WHERE PEOPLE HELPED EACH OTHER AND IT WAS GREAT....

    Any way got home and flushed the engine with kerosene, had to do it three times to get it to drain clear kero. at 15 cents a gallon wth, right.. so i drove it like that for a while, then i started building a 1949 flathead to go in, mallory dual point ignition, edelbrock finned heads, jahns racing pistons, valve job, ground crank new bearings. new oil pump and a modest cam, but get this a edelbrock 3X2barreled carbs, we put it in the 35 and hold flathead batman did it go,,, also dual exh. it was 1950 **** hot pickemup

  8. #908
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    As long as you are happy with the finished product, that's all that matters.

    I bet you would like to have '50 flathead powered pick up now.

  9. #909
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    Yeah, I’ve done a couple of those things. "Been there, done that - you wanna' see the scar?"

    I’ve had at least one engine (not a Jeep this time – maybe a Dodge) that had sat for a long enough time that the oil came out more like syrup than oil – real thick and unbelievably nasty. I pulled the plugs, put in a gallon of diesel or kerosene and cranked it until the battery started to sag a bit. I put the battery on the charger, drained the kerosene (nasty stuff) and just let it sit for a couple of hours.

    I added another gallon of kerosene, repeated the process and put fresh oil in it. It seemed to be OK as I remember – no big smoke clouds or knocks.

    The last L-134 engine I had in the ’48 was worn very badly – I really did leave a cloud of smoke behind me. (Have you noticed - that’s something you don’t see anymore on a regular basis)? One of the discount gas stations had a reclaimed oil pump. Reclaimed oil was about 20-cents a quart and when the oil pressure gauge would start to droop I would pull up to the oil pump and put 60-cents worth of oil directly into the filler tube. I found the F-134 I have now laying in a barnyard and after I installed it, I left that L-134 at the gate of the local junkyard one night. And, yeah - I wish I had that engine back... .

    Around 1972 my boss had a ’59 Pontiac that he cared for meticulously. Every 2001 miles it would be overdue for an oil change – he was that kind of guy – an engineer’s engineer. I stopped by one day to see him and he had just finished an oil change. There was a gallon milk carton (remember waxed paper milk cartons?) full of warm oil sitting in the driveway. I asked him if I could have it and he said “OK”. I immediately poured about half of it into the Jeep and he went spastic.

    “That’s used oil!” he spluttered. My reply: “That’s OK , it won’t be in there all that long anyway”.

    We did what we needed to do to get by back then.

  10. #910
    Senior Member pelago's Avatar
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    YUP, WE DID WHAT WE DID, SOMETIME WILL HAVE TO TELL THE STORY OF MEETING THE CHICAGO VICE LORDS IN FOREST PRESERVE WHILE IN THE PICK UP. AND MY BUDDY THOUGHT THEY ONLY WERE FIRING BLANKS....SUMMER OF 1962
    Damn wish i had those old cars now, but i am keeping the spare f 134 i have.....
    Last edited by pelago; 10-27-2018 at 03:25 PM.

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