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Thread: The Frankenjeep

  1. #51
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    That shoots that idea. No problems, just will take some extra time to dial it in. I watched the video to see if I could learn something new, and he recommended to making the ring gear bearings oversized for ease of shiming, but not the pinion. I see what he is saying about if you measure the Shims, you shouldn't need to do the pinion depth more than once. That is true to a point. I still like the option to be able to take it all apart until I have had everything to my liking. All in all, he covered the process really well.

  2. #52
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    Thanks for the video reference. I forget those are out there because I have limited internet on my computer and streaming video maxes it out pretty fast. The new phone is unlimited but old habits die hard. Itís good to see the procedure I am about to undertake and it saved me a potential headache. I had neglected to mark the bearing caps. Fortunately, I hadnít cleaned those parts yet and was able to match the caps to the position they were in by lining up the rust and sludge patterns. Of course I donít know that the last person who had it apart knew what they were doing either.

  3. #53
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    I worked at a Ford tractor dealer, and we dealt with 2Ns through the industrial series. We worked a lot of rear end gears with various issues. The worst I ever saw was a shyster who was taking his tractor to an auction barn. The tractor ran well, but the ring gear had missing teeth. The owner of the business to where I worked was a shyster extraordinaire, so he took on the "repair" work. I was instructed to remove the shims out of the axle to bring the ring gear closer to the pinion. No parts were installed, even though the pinion bearings were shot. After I put it back together, we took the fork lift and picked up the rear of the tractor, and took it out of the shop. The owner came and loaded it on his trailer and took off. We knew that the new owner was not going to be happy when it failed. That heart burn of having to do such a dirty deal has stuck with me ever since. After that instance, we did have a farmer who purchased a Allis Chalmers D-17 tractor at an auction. It had a miss to it, and the farmer did try and do a tune up, but it still had a miss. He brought it by the shop to see if we could figure out what was going on. First thing I tried was a compression test. The results were around 75, 70, 0, 75. After taking the tester off the number three hole, we turned the engine over again with just a finger over the spark plug hole. Nothing, not even a breeze. We called the farmer, and he gave the go ahead to pull the head to see what was up. When the head was pulled, it was a surprise to what we found. There was no piston, but in it's place was a chunk of maple log. Evidently, the previous owner had drove the wood into the cylinder to seal off a cracked sleeve. Another call was made to the farmer, and he came down to see it for himself. He gave the go ahead to pull the sleeve, (after drilling out the log) and order up the replacement parts. If I remember correctly, we didn't have $50 in a new sleeve, head gasket,a used connecting rod, and a piston/bearings/rings. The crank had the old bearings hose clamped in place to keep the oil pressure somewhat stable. The crank polished up nicely with some emery cloth. After the engine was reassembled, it ran lie a top. Used equipment and vehicles, you just never know what you are getting.

    Computers are nice, when they work. It wasn't too many years ago that my office was filled with books and catalogues with all the information I needed. Slowly I have converted over to having everything on line. I once asked one of our suppliers if he had a catalogue for me to thumb through. He looked at me like I was from a third world country. We don't have books anymore, he promptly quipped. I like Kaiser Willys, because they still send out a free catalogue. Every year I still thumb through it, and make a plan on what I want, and what I need. The long suffering misses tends to want to hide it from the top of the coffee table, but I have figured out the hiding places.... Modern conveniences are nice, but we need to remember how to do things manually. Smart phones are great, but people let them become an electronic leash. A walk through the store, all you see are folks, (young and old) glued to their phones. I can't tell how many times I've been run into by folks not paying attention to where they are going for staring at their phone.
    Rant over.

  4. #54
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    I hear you. I have gotten to where I like using a notepad to keep my books on. I find searchable pdf files invaluable in the field (as long as the battery will last anyway) and the wind doesn’t mess with the pages but, when I am in the recliner researching something, nothing beats paper.

  5. #55
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    When we would get new personnel in, I would hand out composition note books to keep notes in. I know my memory is crap, so it helps to write down everything. I had one guy that was not a great mechanic, but was an excellent note taker. He filled at least three note books with a quick reference for common part numbers, then if we had an issue, what the problem is, and what the solution was. He ended up being the best tech I had. Now he has moved on to another division in our outfit, and is the lead for testing new vehicles. The techs do have the military manuals online, but they are written for the average 19 year old soldier. It's great for changing part(s), but very lousy for troubleshooting.

  6. #56
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    And the nice thing about the KWAS catalog, you can put it in the basket in the "reading room" and pretty soon you become very familiar with a lot of Jeep parts!

    "But, I just read it for the articles"

  7. #57
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    Not quite ready for this but decided to get a repli-tub kit while I had the money. I am pretty new at this kind of work but looks and feels pretty good to me.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Jeff
    '51 CJ3A
    '47 CJ2A

  8. #58
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    51 CJ3,

    I've read good things about the Repli-tub. One of our other members, TJones, has purchased one as well. He is in the process of building his, so he would be a good source of information on his experience. Good Luck! We are here if you need any encouragement!

    http://willysjeepforum.kaiserwillys....e-Forum/page17

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by 51 CJ3 View Post
    ...I had neglected to mark the bearing caps. Fortunately, I hadn’t cleaned those parts yet and was able to match the caps to the position they were in by lining up the rust and sludge patterns. Of course I don’t know that the last person who had it apart knew what they were doing either.
    I finally got back to being able to look at this thing again. A while back I downloaded the military manuals for the Jeep because I figured they would be a little more in depth than the Universal Jeep manual since military members aren’t always assigned to jobs thry are best suited to do. I was right. The civilian manual mentions the factory marks on the caps but the military manual tells how the caps are marked and includes pictures so I had a look at mine. Sure enough, they are factory marked and the last person to install the caps had them in the wrong position. Now I am glad I didn’t mark them.
    Jeff
    '51 CJ3A
    '47 CJ2A

  10. #60
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    To this day, all the manuals are written and illustrated for the average 18 year old soldier to comprehend.

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