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Thread: The Frankenjeep

  1. #111
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    Jeff do you have the output clutch gear in there? Just to be sure, the output gear should be against a thrust washer and a snap ring. Then the output clutch gear slides on. #37 snap ring is the ring that goes on the bearing O.D.. The thrust washer is item #44 and the snap ring that holds it there is #43. Then the clutch gear #42 goes on. Until you get the cap on and shimmed up, things will be out of position. So yes things will need to be moved around a bit to get it together. It is a little tricky, but you just need to tap the bearings around to get everything to to stay together while you assemble it.
    Last edited by bmorgil; 08-25-2022 at 04:25 PM.

  2. #112
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    I found the solution. The front cover has a lip that that sets the depth of the front bearing cup. It should be recessed about an eighth inch. I haven’t looked at the rear cover to see how the rear bearing cup is held but I’ll cross that bridge when I get there. Might be a while… I can’t find the snap ring (#37) but found a new pilot bushing for the output shaft. My bushing puller (slide hammer type) isn’t move the old one. I wish I hadn’t waited 4 years to put this back together!
    8DB4A456-1131-41B2-B269-880BB8488C4C.jpg
    Jeff
    '51 CJ3A
    '47 CJ2A

  3. #113
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    To get the bushing out you can pack it full with grease. Then squeeze the shaft into it slightly and give the output shaft a rap with a soft hammer and repeat. The hydraulic force should push it out. You will need to have the shaft with the bushing in it against something solid. You are looking for a hydraulic "shock".

    Before you remove it, check it to be sure it is bad. I have read, and I am sure others have too, that this bushing can wear. In my experience this is NOT usually the case. I have seen bad ones of course, but generally that bushing is very durable. It will run through hell. I have seen them come out of a water filled rust box and still be in spec. A well burnished bushing is a good thing, unless it is worn too loose. It needs to be .628 to .630 and not much more. Be ready to have to ream the new bushing. If you don't have a good sharp .628 reamer and a reaming tool/lathe, a machine and tool shop will get it done for you. To ream brass and oilite bronze, the reamer must be very sharp. Like new sharp.
    Last edited by bmorgil; 08-25-2022 at 06:34 PM.

  4. #114
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    Found it! I keep most of my hardware in labeled cloth mail bags. When I finally found the bag I found the the snap ring. The bag had fallen into a junk box under one of the tables and got covered up over the years. I have some cleaning to do but it all appears to be there.

    Thanks for the guidance.

    9D80045E-AFB3-4166-B1AF-E89B28428D74.jpg
    Last edited by 51 CJ3; 08-25-2022 at 08:02 PM.
    Jeff
    '51 CJ3A
    '47 CJ2A

  5. #115
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    I took several measurements of the bushing. None of them were less than .634”.

    I am not grasping the how to use hydraulic force to push the bushing out. Big hole where the bushing has to come out. Little hole at the other end of the cavity for lubrication. I don’t see a way to seal anything to allow any pressure to build or squeeze… unless you mean put it in a vice and squeeze on the splines. Kinda funny…30+ years as a professional mechanic and this one bushing has me stymied.

    This is likely going to cost me another bearing since the shaft is assembled and installed.
    Jeff
    '51 CJ3A
    '47 CJ2A

  6. #116
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    Jeff this is an old trick to get pilot bushings out of crankshafts. It works equally well on these bushings. You pack the bushing and shaft full with grease. Stand it up on a wood block with a hole to hold it upright. hold it in there tight. You have to block the grease so it pushes against the bushing. The bushing is soft and will move.The mating shaft is a close enough fit that the grease cant squirt out fast enough. When you rap the end of the shaft, the thick grease will hydraulically lock because it cant leak out fast enough wth everything blocked. This is providing you hit the shaft hard enough to create some speed.You want a heavy soft hammer. You hit the shaft into the bushing packed with grease. You hit it as hard as if you were trying to drive it in or out. Most of the shock will be transferred into the grease which is not compressible. It cant leak fast enough if you hit it hard enough. The force will be transferred to the bushing and the pressure will begin to push it out. Keep packing and smacking until it comes out.

    I hear you on the 30 years of service. I marvel at how I pick up something new all the time. If it makes you feel better, the mechanic who taught me that was better than 60 years in the business and it was 50 years ago! I have used that lesson a few times in my life. Once deep in the belly of a ship at sea.

    .634" is tempting to let ride Jeff. You need a plug gauge to be sure on the I.D. . If you are dead sure, .634" is a little too much. If the two parts feel fairly good together, not wobbly side to side more than a couple of thousands or so, its good and probably wont get much better if you replace it. If it is too loose it gets difficult to shift. Usually when they are out so is the mating portion of the shaft. When they go they go badly and get very wobbly quickly. They are typically very worn or not at all. There is certainly nothing wrong with replacing it to be sure. I have definitely done that also! When in doubt....
    Last edited by bmorgil; 08-30-2022 at 09:42 PM.

  7. #117
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    Then if for some reason you don't have a supply of grease, you can pack the bushing with loaf bread. Sounds crazy, but it works as well.

  8. #118
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    I have lots of grease. A couple of different grades of wheel bearing grease, marine grease, lithium grease, aircraft grease…tubs and guns. No shortage of grease around here.

    I am pretty confident on the .634”. Plug gauges would be better but I used a telescoping set and run it at a lot of different angles and depths. Early on I got a .637” but I hit the oil groove on that one. After that I had a light where I could watch and where the gauge was. There is a noticeable difference in the feel of the new bushing on the shaft versus the old one. I will have to check my reamers. I don’t know that I have any in the needed range but I do have a lathe so my tooling is at least half way there. Thanks for the clarification on how the grease works. If my dead blow hammer isn’t big enough I can always try the 3 pound sledgehammer with a block of wood.

    I figure I will quit learning the day they spread my ashes. I don’t think I would want it any other way.
    Jeff
    '51 CJ3A
    '47 CJ2A

  9. #119
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    Agree on the ashes man!

    You wont need the three pounder, a small dead blow should get it done. The "grease blow" should slowly walk the bushing out. With the tools you have available, you could always chuck it up in the lathe and tap it for a 11/16"-24, long bolt, and pull it that way. Use a piece of tubing or pipe larger than the bushing, a washer and a nut on the bolt. Just run the bolt well into the bushing with the tubing or pipe, and washer and nut. Using the greased washer under the greased nut, tighten the nut against the tube drawing the bushing into the tube or pipe.

    If you find a reamer, sharpen it up like new. The Oilite bronze that was used in the bushing will really gall up and destroy your attempt at a smooth uniform I.D..
    Last edited by bmorgil; 08-31-2022 at 06:24 PM.

  10. #120
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    Still fighting the pilot bushing. Assuming I understood the instructions, this should have worked that bushing out but it hasn’t moved at all (measuring with calipers)
    6E8511CB-7492-4D47-9598-C79B7E9E3247.jpg
    Jeff
    '51 CJ3A
    '47 CJ2A

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