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Thread: The Frankenjeep

  1. #41
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    I think the hard part with electrolysis at home is with the size of the tank. It can be done at relatively low amperage, it just takes a while. Small parts are easy. I watched a video of a trailer being done. They essentially made a swimming pool using a pond liner or plastic sheeting and suspended the trailer from a rack over head. Although not as big, finding a container to suspend the windshield frame in isn’t an economical task if you don’t already have what you need. A poly stock tank is the first thing that comes to mind but they are a few hundred dollars.

  2. #42
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    I put some thought into the electrolysis process. You can use your automatic charger, but may want to put a battery in line to make the system more efficient. Use a few pieces of rebar, and connect them together for a ground. A wooden box with a good tarp would suffice for a container.

  3. #43
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    Another less complicated option for rust removal is Metal Rescue. I haven't personally tried it, but might be worth a look.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Workshop-He...UAAOSwImRYEApu

  4. #44
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    It’s worth a look. Appears to be widely available...Home Depot, Walmart, auto parts stores.

  5. #45
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    And so it begins for real... Yanked the transmission and transfer case today. Oil was milky. Corrosion on some of the gears and at least one chipped tooth in the transmission. Haven't opened the transfer case yet but I am expecting more of the same. The front drive shaft needs u-joints and the slip joint is wore out. It felt like the pinion bearings were rough in the front pumpkin so I opened it up. The oil looked okay but it was gritty and there is some corrosion on everything I can see. I don't have a spreader so tomorrow I will see if I can build one, take inventory of what I need and place an order.

  6. #46
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    I stumbled across a good T90C transmission for a lot less than I can overhaul my T90A. Will the difference in gearing be very noticeable for general use?

    On another note... my pinion bearings in the front are shot along with the carrier bearings. Having a devil of a time trying to get everything apart.
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  7. #47
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    Here is what I could find on the differences between the A model compared to the C model. The gear ratio is a bit higher, so you will have a little bit better top end speed. Maybe not noticeable, but slight difference.

    https://www.thecj2apage.com/forums/t...opic30188.html

  8. #48
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    Thanks for the link. There is some good discussion there. I had found the transmission specs on the Novak website. Sourcing parts may be an issue if I need parts in the future but I haven’t checked any further than my normal sources yet either. The T90A needs a cluster gear and sliding gear. The T90C was a side shift but needs nothing and would bolt right in. The previous owner was talking about throwing it in the trash so I rescued it.

    Front differential: I used a puller on the carrier bearings and ruined every shim doing it. I knocked the inner pinion bearing cup out with a hammer and punch not realizing there are shims there too. I am concerned about the test fitting process when it goes back together. Is there a way to remove the bearings and races in the differential that doesn’t destroy the shims?

  9. #49
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    There is not a good way to pull the pinion without damaging the shims. There is no great way to punch out a pinion race without using brute force. A tip to setting your new pinion would be to take the old bearings a races, and clearance the mating surfaces of both the bearing and race so they slide onto the pinion, and housing so you do not have to press on and off the bearings each time you check your pinion depth. Just clearance enough to allow the bearing and race enough to slide into place, but not too much. Usually you measure the shim pack that was removed to get a base line measurement. Measure each shim individually, then add all the measurements together to get the proper shim height.

    A good point of reference on You Tube, is a guy that goes by Metal shaper. He has a lot of good information on how to do things correctly. He shows some special tools for differential work that would make life so much more simple.

  10. #50
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    My plan was to measure the old shims to get a starting point so it sounds like I am on the right track. The old bearings are gone. The cage fell off the inner pinion bearing when I pulled the pinion (had to use a puller to get the race off the shaft) and the carrier bearings fought me so hard the cages got ripped off in the process. I thought I was going to have to cut the right one off. Between the rollers in the transmission and the rollers from the broken cone bearings and u-joints, I have lots of rollers rolling around the shop today.

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