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Thread: New to the forum! 1949 Willys Truck

  1. #1
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    New to the forum! 1949 Willys Truck

    Got the truck from my mother about 4 years ago finally have the time and some money to start working on it. Hasn't ran in over 20 years so i'm planning on tearing it down to the frame and re doing everything. body is pretty good. engine has a crack in the block and it has been sitting out side so basically everything needs ran through. I am thinking of doing a diesel probably cummins engine but i'm still on the fence of going that route due to costs plus i haven't done any measurements on it. I'v had a lot of ppl tell me just put the cab and bed on the a new frame but i'm not really interested in that kind of a sentimental thing.

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    Welcome, I think a diesel engine in Willys truck is a cool idea. I am thinking about putting one in my CJ3A. They do cost a bit. I have mine estimated as a $6K mod using a Kubota and the prices I have found so far (it may take a while to make that happen). New blocks for the original engines are now available for less than $2K and some cracks can be repaired.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    The '48 and '49 trucks have really classic, clean lines.

    You can put either the F-head or L-head engine in it (depending on what you can find). High ratio rear-end gears make for high revs to run 55 or 60 mph - which a lot of guys want from an engine swap.

    Here's the '48. It cleaned up pretty good
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    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    Welcome! I found some information on a Cummins swap in a Willys Jeep pickup. If you can find a 4BT for a reasonable price, that would be the way to go. The 6BT would require a lot of frame and suspension beefing in order to support the extra weight. The standard Willys frame is able to handle the weight of a V-8 gas engine, but the increase of torque can twist a standard frame fairly easily. I have a 63 wagon with a SBC. The frame has now been stripped, and have found no signs of fatigue. With that being said, a wagon frame has more support from the body being one piece, as compared to a pick up. I have often thought about a Detroit 4-71 two stroke in a Jeep, but I like to torture myself trying to sop up oil puddles in the drive way. Keep up posted on your progress!

    http://www.oldwillysforum.com/forum/...powered-Willys
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    willys 1.jpgwillys 2.jpgwillys.jpg

    here are so poor pics but better than nothing ill take better ones once i get it to my house probably this weekend. Need to find tires cant read the sizes so ill have to measure them. Does anyone know were i can get tires locally or will i have to order them i haven't really looked into it much yet.
    Last edited by mcgregordm; 03-12-2018 at 10:34 AM.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    The wheels look like 16" wheels. The stock size would have been 700 X 16". Depending on your location, a local farm tire shop would be able to set you up. Kaiser Willys has carries tires, but the shipping would be expensive, (not covered under the $98.00 free shipping). Someone once said that Jegs has the tires and offers free shipping. Another option would be to use a modern radial tire, just be careful to get one narrow enough fit the rim width. Radials will be more road friendly when you get it out on the road.

    I would try and air the tires up first. You would be surprised on how bad a tire is, will still hold air. I have a set of tires that are most likely put on in the early 50's. The side walls are peeling off in chunks, but they hold air well.
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    Last edited by gmwillys; 03-12-2018 at 01:40 PM.

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    yeah im going to try that first they just look pretty bad. Im going to check with some shops around here to see if they can get any that are 700 or 650 depending thr width i need.

  8. #8
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    Either will work with the rims that you have.

  9. #9
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcgregordm View Post
    yeah im going to try that first they just look pretty bad. Im going to check with some shops around here to see if they can get any that are 700 or 650 depending thr width i need.
    Just to get it moving around, you may get away with new tubes. I found 6.50 x 16 at a farm dealer, but preciou$$.

  10. #10
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    LarrBeard is right. I keep the tires shown above for rolling projects. I don't care if they get overspray on them, or get flat spotted from sitting. It just depends on your time table for having the truck on the road. I tend to invest in the heep itself, then tires when you are ready to roll out. I have a "new" pair of tires that were purchased in 1991, for the front of the wagon. They are still like new, but have weather checking from sitting in storage.

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