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Thread: More Carter YF-938SD problems

  1. #11
    Member Nemo von Klepper's Avatar
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    Thanks, I've been off line a little while now, but I'm back.

    I absolutely agree about the fuel pressure regulator now. I ended up getting a Holley 1208, offered by KW. It has a range between 1 to 4 lbs. The instructions indicate that the pressure can effect the float height, so I'm confident that I'm on the right track: set the float height as close as I can to factory spec and then adjust the fuel pressure to as close as I can get to 1.5 lbs.

    Any recommendations on where to mount it? I was thinking of someplace near the carb or mounted to the fender opposite of the fuel pump.

    Re: the radiator: Thanks for the tip. I wasn't so sure. All the stuff I could find on the web only indicates stop leak is good for emergency fixes. I also had a friend that completely screwed up his newish Ford SUV. My other collector cars are Saab C900s and I wouldn't dream of putting stop leak in them--way too much precision engineering. Because the Willys are so rough 'n tough, I thought they might be able to take it. Thanks again for the caution.

  2. #12
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    Where to Hide Fuel Pressure Regulator

    Quote Originally Posted by Nemo von Klepper View Post

    Any recommendations on where to mount it? I was thinking of someplace near the carb.
    In the '48 we put it just under the fuel filter - which you can just see in the attached picture - and that kept it out of the way. The Mr. Gasket regulator works very well and isn't all that hard to tuck away.

    Looking back a bit - we probably should have put the filter first in line to keep any crud out of the regulator ..... duuhhhhhh.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by LarrBeard; 10-19-2018 at 02:36 PM. Reason: Just had a better idea!

  3. #13
    Member Nemo von Klepper's Avatar
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    Ok, that's good info. I'm still in the process of getting this thing running. I've had the jeep sipping gas out of a gas can: plastic gas can> rubber gas hose> fuel filter> fuel pump> rubber gas hose> carb. Because of my float/pressure problems causing flooding, I decided to put in a pressure regulator.

    I plan to go ahead and install all new factory spec fuel lines next month if I can get it fired up this month and fix the pressure/flooding problems. On the 3B, the setup more closely resembles a 5 than a 2B, I think. Anyway, the previous owner put in the wrong fuel pump. I need a dual action to operate the windshield wipers (unless of course any of you would have any reason to advise against vacuum wipers). The setup for the 3B and 5 had a sediment bowl in the pump, I believe.

    I'm sort of inclined to run the fuel line: Steel tank> steel line> dual action pump w/ bowl> flex hose> fuel filter> flex hose> pressure regulator (mounted on the fender)> flex> steel line> carb.

  4. #14
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    With the cost of a double action fuel pump, I would install a filter before the fuel pump. I have one on the frame rail, just past the steering box. If you have a good tank, and clean fuel lines it's not a big deal, but odd things end up in fuel tanks.

  5. #15
    I am intalling a Carter YF on my F 134 1961. The solex keeps flooding. Bought a rebuilt Carter off ebay. Received it and as soon as I saw it I knew it would not work. The choke linkage was on backwards. I could also see the accelator pump was not working. Have to rebuild to use. Just because you buy a part " rebuilt to factory specs" check it over before you install. I am going to keep it because I need the body.

  6. #16
    The ebay seller said he is sending a rebuild kit. It is nice to know that some sellers stand behind their product. Should only take hour to put carburetor in working condition. Will see if a Carter will solve the flooding problems of the Solex.

  7. #17
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    Carter YF Rebuild

    [QUOTE=Sebastian21;6105Should only take hour to put carburetor in working condition. [/QUOTE]

    You had mentioned that there were issues with the accelerator pump.

    I had an adventure with the accelerator pump on my YF. There are two coaxial springs on the pump diaphragm shaft that want to go zinging all over the shop when you replace them. The are called Da**it Springs because that is what you say when they take off. The little clip that holds them in place is also sometimes called a da**it clip - for the same reason.

    There is a block secured to the carb body with four screws that holds the accelerator pump diaphragm in place. If the diaphragm was not replaced, the old diaphragm gets really sticky and glues everything in place. I used an industrial heat gun to get things to come apart on my YF.

    I hope you have an easier time...

  8. #18
    you nailed the problem exactly. One of those spring was missing and the clip was gone. When I get the rebuild kit I think I will do it inside a box so I do not have to chase the springs so far. Thanks for the heads up.

  9. #19
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    Carter YF Information

    More than you would ever need to know about the Carter YF.

    https://www.cj3b.info/Tech/Carburetor.html

    https://www.cj3b.info/Tech/CarbsDave1.html

  10. #20
    Member Nemo von Klepper's Avatar
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    Good luck with the rebuild. I had mine blow apart, but luckily they didn't take out an eye or get lost.

    So...
    I installed the pressure regulator to hang off the carb with a couple L brackets. It's not pretty yet, but I can probably fabricate a prettier one later after I get these bugs ironed out. The pressure regulator solved my flooding problems right away. The engine runs as long as I want and I can shut it off with the switch.

    Now I just swapped one problem for another: The pressure regulator has three 3/4"ports: one in, two out. I plugged the one and reduced the others so that they will accept the standard pressure fittings. This thing is leaking rather badly, which is why I shut the engine down sooner than later. The pressure fittings seem to be ok, but the reducers and other threaded locations seem to be suspect.

    Anyone have a thread sealant they can recommend? If this were regular plumbing, I would have used teflon tape. I didn't because I was afraid of it melting and gumming up my carp, etc. I've also red that even yellow gas tape can have little pieces break off and jam the float valve, etc. I think some sort of thread paste is wanted. Anyone have any recommendations?

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