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Thread: More Carter YF-938SD problems

  1. #21
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    We use loctite 567 thread sealant on all our pipe thread fuel fittings, with no issues. It holds up to JP8 and diesel fuel.

  2. #22
    Member Nemo von Klepper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmwillys View Post
    With the cost of a double action fuel pump, I would install a filter before the fuel pump... but odd things end up in fuel tanks.
    Thanks, I agree. I was going to add a sediment bowl on my system with my current fuel pump until I realized the dual action has a sediment bowl and I would need that fuel pump for my vacuum windshield wipers. Honestly the reason I am still sipping the gas out of a plastic gas can is that I don't trust that the tank doesn't have a hornets nest in it that would just clog my filter. I'm trying to keep problems at a minimum at this stage, until I have that engine tuned and ready to roll. It's a thought to just add a filter in line ahead of the pump regardless, the way I have it now--they're cheap enough.

  3. #23
    Member Nemo von Klepper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmwillys View Post
    We use loctite 567 thread sealant on all our pipe thread fuel fittings, with no issues. It holds up to JP8 and diesel fuel.
    Thanks, that's good advice. I did a little more research and it turns out a lot of boaters use Permatex Aviation Form-A-Gasket No.3 for this kind of problem. A pint can costs $8.

  4. #24
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    There are two useful ways to clean a gas tank, to ensure that you don't have crud in the tank;
    1. Have a radiator shop hot tank the gas tank. Cost depends on the shop.
    2. Use fish tank gravel and shake vigorously. The gravel is a bit tedious, and tough to get all the rocks back out. It isn't impossible, because the tank isn't baffled.

    Both methods would best be followed up with a gas tank sealer. Redcoat sealer works well, and lasts for a long time, if not forever. The sealer smooths out any rust spots, and prevents new spots from forming.
    Last edited by gmwillys; 10-22-2018 at 06:11 PM.

  5. #25
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    Teflon tape does not dissolve or deteriorate in gasoline - it's OK for making up joints if you don't have the Loc-tite or Permatex stuff.

  6. #26
    Member Nemo von Klepper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmwillys View Post
    Redcoat sealer works well, and lasts for a long time, if not forever. The sealer smooths out any rust spots, and prevents new spots from forming.
    Thanks for that advice. So I was looking at some videos about application. It seems the instructions require the tank to be rotated for 3 hrs to keep the sealer from pooling. I was wondering if this is a constant rotation, or come back every 30 minutes and agitate it? If it's the former, you would just about need a gimbal. Obviously the same gimbal would work great with your fish tank gravel. Any thoughts?

  7. #27
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    When I did the last tank, I rotated the tank until there was a good coating all over. Then go back every 5 to 10 minutes and repeat. On the first Jeep tank I did, I turned it more often, since it was light. On the bigger military tanks, it gets tiresome quickly. Just keep a close eye on it until the liquid dries.
    You want to ensure that the top of the tank gets the most attention. Rust forms where gas isn't, so rust flakes that clog the filter comes from the top.
    Last edited by gmwillys; 10-25-2018 at 02:11 PM.

  8. #28
    Why clean a rusted tank? You will be dealing with pin holes that will continue to give you problems. You can get a new tank for 175.00.

  9. #29
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    True, the CJ tanks are relatively cheap. The military tanks, (M38, M38A1, M151, A1-A2) are not cheap. I have only had one M38A1 tank that sat open that was too far gone to fix. Most tanks that I have dealt with have rust scale on the upper sections of the tank. The best cases/easiest fixes were the ones that had old varnished gas in them. Depending on whether there was a cab installed, or the heep was kept outside in the elements. Sometimes there are pin holes in the top, and aren't too difficult to patch. It isn't hard to braze, or weld in a patch, then pressure test. After that, then apply the Redcoat. In my opinion, I would put the Redcoat in a brand new tank.
    Last edited by gmwillys; 10-25-2018 at 07:17 PM.

  10. #30
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    One thing I didn't think about, was the heat riser vane in the intake manifold. The guy that runs the old Jeep carb website posted this;


    .
    Post by scoutpilot on 3 hours ago

    Without a properly functioning heat riser valve, going after the carburetor will frustrate the living heck out of you. If the valve is stuck in the open (cold) position, heat from the exhaust will continuously bathe the bottom of any carb you put up there. The heat will cause the gas in the bowl to boil. The resulting pressure will force fuel past any metering device and flood the manifold.

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