Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 59

Thread: CJ-3A First Willys

  1. #1
    Senior Member bmorgil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Northwestern Ohio
    Posts
    148

    CJ-3A First Willys

    Hello all! I am starting my first Willys Jeep. I attended the 2018 TOLEDO JEEP FEST. https://www.toledojeepfest.com/ Wow what an event! This city really shows up for the JEEP! So many people, and thousands of Jeeps. I was hooked. Went out and bought one. It is a 1950 CJ-3A that was used as a farm tractor in Michigan. This saved the frame from the rust generated in the rust belt. It did not save the body. The body was barley there so, I started the project by just getting all of the rust and plastic repair out off the way and ordered a Tub Kit. Surprisingly, a lot of original stuff is still here. Most of my work looks like it will be repairing the "hacking" that occurred. I am officially the second owner of this Willys. Some one before me was very fond of their welder. The repairs to the frame will include rebuilding the left front frame horn where cutting took place. The frame spring mounts were removed and, a piece of channel iron was welded in place to attempt a prehistoric lift. Really bad work there. Grinding and getting those off and the new mounts back on will be tough. The body was welded on in the back and, I had to grind out the chopped up rear cross member/bumper that was welded to the body. In the engine bay I think I have a truck motor. It is the right casting numbers (641087-L-W5A on the Block / 640161 on the Head). The motor however is stamped 4T10443 A. I have read that it still could be the original motor as some engines were used from various locations in the Willys plant when inventory went low. The welding/chopping in the motor house continued. Angle iron welded in, battery box chopped up. Fenders welded on the oil filter is severely hacked up and relocated. The most unbelievable thing... the radiator was welded in! Much more to fix but, I am sure you all know that is coming!

    I am looking forward to everyone's help and advise. I have a few old classic vehicles. This is my second frame off. Many years ago, I restored a 1959 Chevy Apache pickup frame off. It was a lot of work. This will be harder on an old body (mine)!
    Last edited by bmorgil; 04-16-2019 at 08:33 AM.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Ft. Wayne, IN
    Posts
    963
    "The motor however is stamped 4T10443 A"

    Engine numbers were originally stamped on a boss at the front of the engine, just behind the water pump. But ... when the head warped and the block got planed off to level things out at the first or second or whenever rebuild, the number on the boss disappears.

    If you have a number on the boss, that might well indicate that the block has never been planed off to level it up. Could be an original engine....

    Just remember the first rule of Jeeps:

    !. What you see is what you have. Trust nothing written if it doesn't match what you have.

    (Most Jeeps are Jeep Soup; a little of this, a little of that and a dash ofsomething else.)

    Keep us informed of what you're finding!

  3. #3
    Senior Member bmorgil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Northwestern Ohio
    Posts
    148
    Thanks LarrBeard! I did not know the first rule of Jeeps. Well I don't think it was decked. The stamped in numbers by the water pump are still quite visible. It was definitely bored. as far as I want to go. It is .060 over. It looks like a broken stud om the intake manifold as well as a broken carb flange, lead to some lean conditions. The previous owner welded in an unknown radiator and, a futile attempt at an electric fan. I am thinking it was heating up pretty good. Nothing like a .060 motor running with vacuum leaks to melt a piston or two. This one ate up two pistons. It looks like it happened right away as the pistons are still fairly clean. There is no ridge and still a cross hatch an the walls. I am tempted to go to the .080 over pistons after a sonic check of the wall thickness. I am concerned because I am reading on the forums that it will run hot. I am hoping to get some experience from others who have gone .080 over (if anyone has). The crank is gorgeous at .010 on the rods and .020 on the crank. I am leaning heavily towards sleeving it back to standard bore. I am sure hoping for some thoughts on this. "Back in the Day" I punched a lot of 283 Chevy's .120 over to make some high revving small blocks. They held up but, we were Drag Racing. I don't think anybody knew how hot they really got! I did have a 454 Chevy bored .120 to a 496. It ran great on the street. It seems though I am reading these little L134 Go Devils run warm. Seems like no one can get them to run under 180 or, 210 under load. Mighty hot for my liking on an old motor. I sure would appreciate some real life experience before I punch it out!

    Definitely will keep posting. I have it totally stripped down now. Sand blasting and machine shop are next. I have to repair the battery box, but I can't find one that looks like mine. The one from KW is two short ( not as tall). It might be OK. I don't know.

    I sure am glad for this forum and all it's members!

  4. #4
    Senior Member bmorgil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Northwestern Ohio
    Posts
    148

    Some picture updates

    Frame and suspension restored. Steering in and alignment set. Brakes restored. Motor rebuilt. I have to apologize for the 12 volt GM 10SI. The prior owner stripped gutted and thoroughly FUBARED everything about the original 6 volt system. It was just to much cost to go back.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by bmorgil; 04-13-2019 at 08:46 PM.

  5. #5
    Senior Member bmorgil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Northwestern Ohio
    Posts
    148
    More pics. Trans is ready to reassemble as soon as the parts arrive.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by bmorgil; 04-13-2019 at 08:47 PM.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    1,526
    Great looking 3A project!
    .60 over is a general rule of thumb, and I have heard that .80 over is nothing but headaches as per from the veteran machinist. Now, if you were to Sonic test the cylinders, and there's an acceptable amount of wall thickness. It would be worth a try. It would be fun to punch one out, then run alcohol.... The possibilities are pretty much endless. I wish I would have kept a couple of blocks that were either stuck or cracked, just for instances like this.

  7. #7
    Senior Member bmorgil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Northwestern Ohio
    Posts
    148
    I did go .080 over gmwillys. It was fully sonic checked. I still have .125 left in the thinnest spot at .080 over. I have my fingers crossed but, I have one of the best machinists in the area. He was recommended to me by a guy who I trusted with some very high end motors, who is now retired. He said not to worry. I will however worry. I believe I have found a bolt in aluminum radiator with the hose locations in the correct spots. The shroud will go on with some simple brackets. I am counting on that combination to keep her cool. I will let all know if the experiment is a success!

    The motor is decked, head milled, crank .020 /.030 under, bore +.080, new valves / seats / springs, balanced rotating assembly, resized connecting rods and reconditioned lifters.
    Last edited by bmorgil; 04-16-2019 at 08:26 AM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member bmorgil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Northwestern Ohio
    Posts
    148

    Ready for the Body

    To me this is the toughest, scariest part. The body. Time to fit the KW body kit.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #9
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    1,526
    The body won't be too bad. Let us know how everything fits.

  10. #10
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Ft. Wayne, IN
    Posts
    963

    Comment from 'Way Back

    In one of your first posts you made a comment:

    "It seems though I am reading these little L134 Go Devils run warm. Seems like no one can get them to run under 180 or, 210 under load."

    I guess a lot depends on what "under load" means.

    Many of the L/F-134's that run hot are engines that have had a lot of use and little care over the years. They tend to have sludged up crusty, rusty blocks and plugged and nasty radiators. If "under load" means crawilng up a cliff in 4WD Low as hard as you can go, yep - they'll heat up.

    But - if under load means all of the seats full of grandkids at 45 MPH and 2600 RPM down the road, or crawling down the street in a parade, a clean block with a clean radiator will run at the thermostat setting all day long. The '48 loves parades. The Corvettes are sitting along the side with the hoods open and we're just puttering along at a slow walk in Low (5.38 rear end helps) at 160 degrees.

    Don't skip the fan shroud when you put it back together and ... to just coin a phrase ... everything will be cool!

    P. S. I am in the Arena Show over at Toledo in August.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •