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Thread: Re-Introduction!! Hello all. Build #3 that wasn't supposed to be a build!!

  1. #11
    Junior Member dvdsjk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sebastian21 View Post
    Is anyone reproducing the F 134 block? They must have been thousands made yet you cannot find one. I had to have my block welded up by a company that specializes in welding blocks, at a considerable expense.
    They say that they are working on it.

  2. #12
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    Looking at the valve spring squeezer - does anyone still have a set of asbestos backed gloves to let you adjust valves with the engine running?

    The asbestos protected your hands from the hot exhaust manifold - but a set of gloves like that would probably be illegal now.

  3. #13
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    I have a set. They work great, but they are getting worn out. One day they'll figure out that fiberglass is just as bad for you. If you take a Geiger counter over Pelagro's gauges on his A1. The radium that was used to illuminate the numbers has a half life of 1,600 years. No problem for the operator, but not recommended to crack one open.

  4. #14
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    Gauges That Glow In The Dark/ Make You Glow In The Dark

    Quote Originally Posted by gmwillys View Post
    If you take a Geiger counter over Pelagro's gauges on his A1. The radium that was used to illuminate the numbers has a half life of 1,600 years. No problem for the operator, but not recommended to crack one open.
    My former professional nemesis, Collins Radio Company, designed a magnificent high-frequency receiver for the Army in the 1950's, the R-390A/URR. Modern digital signal processors match it, but only match it - not do better. Pelago knows that radio, unless I am badly mistaken - all of us used it at one time or another.

    For some reason the Army decided that the audio level meter and the signal strength meter needed to glow in the dark. And, the solution was radium and phosphorous. When the receivers were taken out of service they were collected into a large pile at one site and the two meters were removed, notwithstanding that they were hermetically sealed meters that you could store for years under 6-feet of fresh water and never get a drop of water in them.

    The audio level meter was a VU meter, which has no exact replacement for the ballistically damped and compensated meter movement. Bureaucratic overkill.
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  5. #15
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    Not much has changed. On post, we have a large variety of tracked vehicles. This ranges is from M113, M60 AVLB (armor vehicle launch bridge), M109 Paladin, M992 FAASV, and the M1 Abrams main battle tank. Most of the radio sets, crew stations, and overall interior of the vehicles hasn't changed from the early sixties. Even the M1 carries over a lot of the same equipment. With that being said, there is a lot of add on equipment that brings the vehicles up to the 21st century, with the capability of battlefield awareness (reduction in friendly fire incidents). But the main systems are still the same.

    In talking about the reproduction engine having casting slag or sand, that isn't too uncommon. The dealership I worked at through college had a fleet of rental Kubota tractors. We pulled a brand new tractor into the shop for its first service. When the oil was dropped, something fell into the drain pan. After fishing it out it was discovered to be part of an engine casting. To be more specific, a portion of a cylinder wall. The piece was machined on one side to include cross hatching, but the other was porous. The service manager called our regional Kubota service rep, and was told that this was not uncommon. He went on to say that if the piece of equipment was running fine, to leave it alone. We being curious decided to spring for an oil pan gasket to at least see how bad the damage was. Upon removal of the oil pan, it was discovered that the piece could not have come from this particular engine. Everything proved to be correct and not damaged. We buttoned the pan back up, and finished the service. To my knowledge, the tractor never did have any problems.
    Last edited by gmwillys; 01-15-2019 at 11:36 AM.

  6. #16
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    "Everything proved to be correct and not damaged. We buttoned the pan back up, and finished the service. To my knowledge, the tractor never did have any problems."

    Seriously,this is always one of the questions when we are working on old Jeeps. If it is working do we leave it alone, or do we work on it until we break it?

    There is no one correct answer and everyone has to be willing to live with their decision.

    That's another reason it's an adventure!

  7. #17
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    The biggest determining factors of trouble on vintage engines would be oil pressure, rod noise, and compression. Low oil pressure doesn't necessarily mean a worn pump. Cam and main bearings would cause a drop in oil pressure when warm. Rod knock would come from over speeding the engine for extended periods of time, (45 mph cruise is best, just because a heep will run up to 55, doesn't mean it likes it). Compression will be either worn rings, or in my 2As case, a hole in the center of the Piston on #3. The moral of the story is that don't always put all your eggs in one basket. If you find evidence of a problem, trace it to ground to ensure the problem is really a problem. As LarrBeard said, fix what's wrong, but don't work on it till it breaks.
    Last edited by gmwillys; 01-15-2019 at 07:45 PM.

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