Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 52

Thread: New guy - Have a lot to learn

  1. #11
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Ft. Wayne, IN
    Posts
    1,023

    Get It Started

    Quote Originally Posted by CMT-1109 View Post
    What do you end up doing LarrBeard to get yours started after sitting awhile?
    In cold weather when I don't want to crank it a long time, I give it a shot of go-juice, crank it through at least four cylinders, then turn on the ignition. It will usually hit on the next cylinder or two.

    Now that it's warmer, I just crank it and jiggle the choke - it goes.

    I don't like starting fluid in any large quantities - just a personal thing.

    I don't think fuel filters do very well as check valves, but I've not thought it through. My mower is the world's worst because the filter is in-line and vertical. From our discussions here the last couple of weeks, we have wondered just how efficient fuel pumps are at the suction side. A check valve might be too big a restriction ...

    We need a guinea pig to try it out for us!

  2. #12
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    1,582
    Most electric fuel pumps are pushers, so they are mounted at or within the fuel tank. As you might have figured where this was going, the engine mounted fuel pumps are pullers. A check valve would have to be set at less than 2 psi, preferably 1 psi to 1.5 psi for the best results. The valve would have to be up stream from the mechanical pump to allow the pump to keep its prime. An electric pump, a check valve isn't really needed, because the pump works fast enough that it will not matter.

    An inline fuel filter is most efficient when the fuel follows the arrow, but it will flow either way.

  3. #13
    Senior Member bmorgil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Northwestern Ohio
    Posts
    233
    I am surprised at this issue. It seems to be common. I would think there was enough fuel in the carburetor bowl to give it a good stat and run long enough for the fuel pump to catch up. From what I am reading, this is not so! It must be an awfully small fuel bowl in the WO or, the bowl drains out somehow? It seems like after a week it shouldn't have evaporated the fuel. I guess these are some of the things I will learn about Vintage Jeep ownership! It's a Jeep thing.
    Last edited by bmorgil; 04-15-2019 at 08:20 AM.

  4. #14
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    1,582
    One thing to keep in mind. These are not real efficient engines. The atomized fuel starts off in the down draft carb, but has to switch directions and go up hill after entering the block. If you don't have great compression, or the valves are not adjusted, it takes a lot to lite off the fuel mixture. On our 2A, you have to pull the choke out all the way, crank the engine about ten seconds, then pump the throttle 5 to 10 times depending on the ambient temperature. It's tired and pretty much worn out, but it does run well after it coughs and hacks a few minutes. The valves and compression are within specs, but it is just cold blooded. Like LarrBeard wrote about, if you have a floor starter, you can use a short burst of starting fluid, turn the engine over with the ignition off for four revolutions, then turn on the key. The engine should start just fine then. If you don't want to use starting fluid, you could pull the choke half way out and follow the same process.

  5. #15
    Senior Member bmorgil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Northwestern Ohio
    Posts
    233
    I got it now! I guess that 6.25 to 1 compression is not helping. So it needs a LOT of fuel! I guess like a lot of old cars you have to walk the line of flooding it when its bone cold.

    No problem with the starting fluid. Used sparingly, its good stuff. I watched a lot of NASCAR motors fire up for the first time in the morning with a shot of coffee for the Crew Chief and a shot of either in the cowl of the car! A whole lot better than a whole lot of cranking.
    Last edited by bmorgil; 04-15-2019 at 06:26 PM.

  6. #16
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    1,582
    When I worked in the far north, we would buy ether by the case. We would have cheap charcoal grills with the legs cut off to slide up under the oil pans of the equipment to warm the oil back to a liquid. One old Freightliner had a old worn out small cam Cummins, and if it was around 50 above, you would have to reach around the windshield to spray half a can into the intake.

    Dirt track cars on alcohol don't run well at all when it is below 80 above.

  7. #17
    Senior Member bmorgil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Northwestern Ohio
    Posts
    233
    Ya gotta love Alcky! I agree on the ether in the cold on a diesel that's for sure! I love the sound of a stone cold diesel pounding out the ether.

    CMT-1109 sounds like give it a quick shot o ether!

  8. #18
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    17
    Bmorgil - it's an option but I'd rather find a good fix for the issue instead!

    I am going to try an inline check valve I think. Once I do, I'll post up the results! Thanks for all the info guys!

  9. #19
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Ft. Wayne, IN
    Posts
    1,023
    You know, this is another one of those mysteries that we have all noticed, but we haven't solved.

    GMWillys is right. On the L-134 engines it is a looooong way for fuel to make its way through that intake manifold, turn the corner, get past that cold valve and make fire.

    But, I see the same lots of cranking characteristic on the F-134 and it is a straight shot down the carb throat into the intake manifold which is part of the head. I say to myself - self - maybe the bowl really is empty. It does sit on top of a warm engine. There is that big vent tube that would give a vapor path back to the atmosphere. I can't see fuel draining back past the needle valve out of the top of the bowl ... hmmm ... .

    Then, there is the low compression engine. As slow as it cranks, it doesn't pull a lot of vacuum - that's why we close the choke - to get a vacuum to pull fuel past the orifices and jets. (By the way, since there isn't a lot of fuel going in there at cranking, restricting air flow makes the mixture richer too - like setting an airplane mixture to Full Rich for start).

    We've been spoiled by high speed starters on fuel injected engines. If our Jeep cranks a while, that lets oil circulate a bit - let's sell the long time to start as an "engine pre-lube" cycle and call it a feature.

  10. #20
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    17
    What if you just removed the gas cap and sprayed some air in there with an air compressor (while holding a rag over the opening of course) to push the fuel through? I guess I just feel like cranking and cranking is unnecessary so I keep thinking of other ways to make it easier on the ol starter. Ha

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •