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Thread: Old to Jeep, New to CJ-2A

  1. #1

    Old to Jeep, New to CJ-2A

    Good Morning All!

    A little about me; I've been driving Mopar since my first vehicle. My first Jeep was purchased in 2001, the first with complete Mopar drive train. I just picked up a 1946 CJ-2A from a good friend of mine and I couldn't be happier. I've always wanted one since I was a wee brat. It's very close to being complete, very little rust and damage. The only real rust I've been able to find is on the cross members under the body which is no big deal. The fuel system was completely fouled but after a replacement pump, lines and filter it started right up and was ready to go. It white-smokes under a good load, but it appears to be mostly fuel mixture or timing / spark plug gap related unless I know less than I think about this system. It does need a bit of love here outside of that and there and the previous owner did a great job upgrading the 6v system to 12v.

    Most of my friends call me "K" so in responding, please feel free. I already have a list of questions the length of my arm and will ask them from time to time and if I can be any help to anyone I will post to the appropriate group. I'm really looking forward to restoring my 46 to it's former glory!

  2. #2
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    Welcome K!

    We will be more than happy to assist in anything you may want to ask. Around here, no question is too small or too big, so ask away. We do like to see pictures of your gem, so don't be bashful.

    A little background on exhaust smoke;

    Black = rich fuel mixture

    Blue = Oil burning through worn piston rings

    White = coolant through a leaky head gasket or a crack in the block/head.

    Since you stated that the smoke shows under load, I would lean toward a bit of a oil being burned off. Your spark plugs will tell the story to what exactly is going on.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lVCs5gWLUyI

  3. #3
    Thank you for the reply. I did review your linked video; i pulled all 4 plugs after running for a while. All 4 were dry and black. Several things before I barrage everyone with questions: 1) I don't know if the plugs are gapped correctly, 2) the timing may be off and/or the points may be burnt. Honestly, I forgot to check that, 3) there is an aftermarket fuel pressure dial in the fuel line between the pump and the carburetor. I have no idea why it's there and how it affects the intake of fuel into the carburetor, 4) this is the original Solex carb, don't know if the jetting is wrong or damaged. I haven't messed with it that much.

    So, needless to say I have work to do this Memorial Day weekend. Now for high end questions:

    1) Does anyone have opinions on what type of spark plugs to use for this particular engine?
    2) Opinions on Solex vs. Carter?
    3) Opinions on replacing distributor with pointless version (my 46 has been converted to 12 volt)
    4) Should I remove the fuel pressure dial, or does it serve a viable purpose for this carburetor?

    I have a ton of other questions, but I wanted to get a feel of whether this is the right location to ask a bunch of noob questions. I will send up pictures Saturday. It's been raining like crazy here in Northern CA for the last week.

    Cheers!

    k

  4. #4
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    Greetings K! I am sure you will get a lot of help here. I sure have!

    It sounds like it is running OK. Is that the case, or are you looking for a problem other than smoke? The smoke is not caused by the plug gap, the timing or the points. Follow the fuel line to the tank. Is there an aftermarket pump in line? I am not sure why there would be a "dial" in the line. Can you take some pics?

    To really check plugs for color, you must load the motor fully and then shut the motor down without idling and pull the plug. If you let the motor travel through other loads like cruising or idle, the plugs will be colored for those conditions. For instance if the plugs are black after idling a while, it could be rich at idle. Or if after a sustained cruise speed the clutch is depressed and you immediately kill the motor without idling, the plugs would indicate that condition. If the motor is burning water, the plugs will be "steam cleaned". At this point I think we might need a little more. Some pics of the plugs too.

    I use a brand name plug. Autolite, Champion, NGK, ACDelco

    I believe your vehicle came stock with a Carter WO. I think the WO is a great little carb. Are you sure you have a Solex?

    I have converted a lot of tractors and older vehicles to electronic. My CJ3A is a Pertronix conversion. If you want to keep it stock, points of course. I love to tinker with points, and they work quite well. I convert to electronic simply because I am lazy and, it is amazingly trouble free.

    I think we will need pictures of this "Dial". Be sure to look at the fuel line all the way to the gas tank. Make sure there isn't another pump in there.

    Bob
    Last edited by bmorgil; 05-23-2019 at 06:36 PM.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    Greetings K! I am sure you will get a lot of help here. I sure have!

    It sounds like it is running OK. Is that the case, or are you looking for a problem other than smoke? The smoke is not caused by the plug gap, the timing or the points. Follow the fuel line to the tank. Is there an aftermarket pump in line? I am not sure why there would be a "dial" in the line. Can you take some pics?

    To really check plugs for color, you must load the motor fully and then shut the motor down without idling and pull the plug. If you let the motor travel through other loads like cruising or idle, the plugs will be colored for those conditions. For instance if the plugs are black after idling a while, it could be rich at idle. Or if after a sustained cruise speed the clutch is depressed and you immediately kill the motor without idling, the plugs would indicate the that condition. If the motor is burning water, the plugs will be "steam cleaned". At this point I think we might need a little more. Some pics of the plugs too.

    Use a brand name plug. Autolite, Champion, NGK, ACDelco

    I believe your vehicle came stock with a Carter WO. I think the WO is a great little carb. Are you sure you have a Solex?

    I have converted a lot of tractors and older vehicles to electronic. My CJ3A is a Pertronix conversion. If you want to keep it stock, points of course. I love to tinker with points, and they work quite well. I convert to electronic simply because I am lazy and, it is amazingly trouble free.

    I think we will need pictures of this "Dial". Be sure to look at the fuel line all the way to the gas tank. Make sure there isn't another pump in there.

    Bob

  6. #6
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    Fuel Pressure "Dial"

    Several of us have found, the hard way, that the original Carter YF and WO carburetors really want to see a fairly low fuel pressure, 1 - 2 PSI. That delivers plenty of fuel to the L/F-134 engines.

    What happens on occasion is that new or rebuilt fuel pumps are too good - they can deliver 8 - 10 PSI and that's just more than the YF/WO wants to handle. Adding a spacer under the fuel pump is a patch that isn't a good idea - it adds a "thump/clunk/clack" when the cam hits the lever on the pump.

    I have a F-134 in the '48 and as part of the trials and tribulations in waking it up again I added a fuel pressure regulator between the new/rebuilt fuel pump and the carb. It's set for about 1.5 PSI and I've had no issues related to fuel pressure since I put it in. The attached photo shows the rig we set up to measure fuel pressure. The gauge says 1.5 and that's where we left it.

    Solex isn't an original carburetor for that engine.

    And, oh by the way - a great explanation of how to read spark plug colors!!! I've not seen such a good explanation before.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #7
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarrBeard View Post
    Several of us have found, the hard way, that the original Carter YF and WO carburetors really want to see a fairly low fuel pressure, 1 - 2 PSI. That delivers plenty of fuel to the L/F-134 engines.

    What happens on occasion is that new or rebuilt fuel pumps are too good - they can deliver 8 - 10 PSI and that's just more than the YF/WO wants to handle. Adding a spacer under the fuel pump is a patch that isn't a good idea - it adds a "thump/clunk/clack" when the cam hits the lever on the pump.

    I have a F-134 in the '48 and as part of the trials and tribulations in waking it up again I added a fuel pressure regulator between the new/rebuilt fuel pump and the carb. It's set for about 1.5 PSI and I've had no issues related to fuel pressure since I put it in. The attached photo shows the rig we set up to measure fuel pressure. The gauge says 1.5 and that's where we left it.
    Wow that is low! I am so used to 6 to 7. After rebuilding my WO, I did observe something that sheds light on what you have found. I found two types of float/needle valves, One type (which was in my carb) was what I am most used to. The needle on a wire hanging from the float arm. The kit I decided to use had a "dampened" needle and seat. The needle valve has a spring internally that loads the valve against the float. I believe this is the stock as delivered way. It is common in carbs destine for off road. The float is controlled much better as the fuel bounces around. I can see how fuel pressure with the dampened float would be hard to control. Any pressure at all will start to compress the seat spring. If the spring isn't strong enough, the needle will leak. It is a tiny spring. I am betting I will experience the same issue.

    K, send us some shots of that "Dial". I'll bet LarrBeard is all over it.
    Last edited by bmorgil; 05-24-2019 at 08:24 AM.

  8. #8
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    LarrBeard is correct on the fuel pressure issue, and the function of the dial. Bmorgil is also correct about the needle and seat. A Carter carb is, in my opinion, is the only way to go. The Soles is a Chinese/Indian knock off, and is most troublesome to set near right. If it starts and runs at idle, then the top end stumbles, or vice versa. If you have a Carter that is need of some help, check out Old Jeep Carbs LTD .com. He is a Jeep carb guru, and can set yours up for years of perfect performance. He flow tests and checks vacuum after rebuilding to ensure everything is working correctly.
    Last edited by gmwillys; 05-24-2019 at 11:41 AM.

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