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Thread: Doing some research on a 1963 wagoneer for a book

  1. #21
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    The high beams are turned on and off by a button on the floor, left foot, just below the emergency brake pedal. Might be funny and true if the sister knows how it works better than he does. Also, the wiper fluid deal was in a bag, not a container. Maybe did not work but the wipers would have, turned by the second button next to the lights.
    Last edited by 5JeepsAz; 09-08-2019 at 10:12 PM.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5JeepsAz View Post
    The high beams are turned on and off by a button on the floor, left foot, just below the emergency brake pedal. Might be funny and true if the sister knows how it works better than he does. Also, the wiper fluid deal was in a bag, not a container. Maybe did not work but the wipers would have, turned by the second button next to the lights.
    The floor? Really? That's worth knowing.

    He is oblivious to a lot of things that his sister picks up on (like when he's being insulted, flirted with, or sarcasm in general), but he is extremely mechanically inclined.

    In a bag? I can't imagine that worked out too well. Lol

  3. #23
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    He will love the tornado engine. Waaaay ahead of it's time. Only someone mechanically inclined would get it.
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  4. #24
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    Oh, definitely. The father was the same way, so he would've bought it for that reason, but maybe never had enough time to tinker with it.

    Now, I just gotta pick a name for this wonderful jeep. ^_^

    Any ideas?

  5. #25
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    Thoughts

    Just some thoughts:

    Learning to work on a Jeep.

    The information in the books often turns out to be a suggestion Ė every Jeep has its own set of likes and dislikes. Probably the biggest area of suggestions is fluid capacities.

    Engine oil is a good example. I donít know the exact numbers for the 230 OHC "Tornado", but typically oil capacity would be specified as 4 quarts or 5 with filter change. It is not unusual for a Jeep to decide that it only wants 4 Ĺ quarts and that extra pint will end up getting blown out the filler cap or dripping out through a seal somewhere. Once it gets down to 4 Ĺ, all is good.

    Differentials, transfer cases and transmissions are much the same story. Too lube much gets thrown out through a vent or leaks past a seal.

    Quirks and Issues

    This quirk comes from the Warner ASI-T90E transmission on my í48, so you may have to use some literary license to use it.

    Some three on the tree transmissions develop a quirk as they get old and wear a bit. The shift pattern, as you are learning, is an H-pattern. Down and left is first gear, up and across the bar of the H goes to second and then straight down is high. Reverse is on the left bar of the H and straight up. On a new, tight transmission all is good, but after a bit of wear (maybe a hundred thousand miles or so) the shift pattern gets a bit cranky.

    To make that shift from first to second, you have to go straight up the left side of the H a bit, just past the bar of the H - almost like you want to go to reverse - but just before you grind a gear, you come back down, cross the bar of the H and go into second. It looks a lot like a Y-pattern with a short leg on the left side of the Y.

    If you try to cram second without the little side trip, the shift levers lock up and you are stuck in no gear and the only thing to do is get under the hood (or the vehicle) and jiggle the shift levers on the side of the transmission. They usually donít stick very hard, but youíve got to go jiggle them, one up (or back) and one down(or forward).

    At one time I kept a stick with a wire hook behind the seat so I could reach the stinkiní levers without having to get dirty and greasy.

  6. #26
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    Quirks are good!

    Quote Originally Posted by LarrBeard View Post
    Some three on the tree transmissions develop a quirk as they get old and wear a bit. The shift pattern, as you are learning, is an H-pattern. Down and left is first gear, up and across the bar of the H goes to second and then straight down is high. Reverse is on the left bar of the H and straight up. On a new, tight transmission all is good, but after a bit of wear (maybe a hundred thousand miles or so) the shift pattern gets a bit cranky.

    To make that shift from first to second, you have to go straight up the left side of the H a bit, just past the bar of the H - almost like you want to go to reverse - but just before you grind a gear, you come back down, cross the bar of the H and go into second. It looks a lot like a Y-pattern with a short leg on the left side of the Y.

    If you try to cram second without the little side trip, the shift levers lock up and you are stuck in no gear and the only thing to do is get under the hood (or the vehicle) and jiggle the shift levers on the side of the transmission. They usually donít stick very hard, but youíve got to go jiggle them, one up (or back) and one down(or forward).

    At one time I kept a stick with a wire hook behind the seat so I could reach the stinkiní levers without having to get dirty and greasy.
    I wouldn't have thought about the amount of fluids, etc, but it makes a lot of sense. I want the father to give the son the owner's manual or something similar to read, but I'm thinking that it might be covered in notes the father added for things like that. I like that.

    As for the cranky gear shift, I love that. It'll be fun for the father to try to explain, but the son adapts quickly. I already imagined the sister hates driving it, and this could be one of the main reasons. She doesn't pick things up quite as easily as he does.

  7. #27
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    My Grandfather was a farmer, and he would take the owner's manual for any and every piece of equipment and read it from cover to cover. He would write important notes in the front cover, then notate any deviations to the oil levels.

    LarrBeard is correct. The shift pattern does become vague at best. Then when you decelerate, the gear shift will pop out of second gear. First gear and reverse are not synchronized, meaning that if the Heep is rolling, you will grind the gears. Second and third are synchronized, so you can shift gears without double clutching;
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DGYuONwK7Nc

  8. #28
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    You should buy an owners manual to see how much information you find in it. "Research" .

  9. #29
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    Grease bibs.


    Okay so these things have little nipples poking out all over the place underneath. You plug a thing on that is similar to old time bicycle ride pumps. Once the hose is connected to the bib, you operate a lever to force grease in. It's a guess when enough is enough. Guarantee the son pumps that thing too many times and ends up will a blob of grease squirting out over there that he does not know what to do with.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmwillys View Post
    My Grandfather was a farmer, and he would take the owner's manual for any and every piece of equipment and read it from cover to cover. He would write important notes in the front cover, then notate any deviations to the oil levels.

    LarrBeard is correct. The shift pattern does become vague at best. Then when you decelerate, the gear shift will pop out of second gear. First gear and reverse are not synchronized, meaning that if the Heep is rolling, you will grind the gears. Second and third are synchronized, so you can shift gears without double clutching;
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DGYuONwK7Nc
    Your grandfather sounds like the kind of man the father in my story is. Very intelligent and organized. Not at all like me, lol.

    I've never even heard of double clutching! That video was very informative!

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