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Thread: Hello, I am new to the forum and the new owner of a 1962 M38A1.

  1. #21
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    I can see no reason to not use the original mechanical pump. I would guess the electric pump is on there because the previous owner lost the mechanical pump. Eventuality the diaphragm rips open and the fuel pumps right into the crankcase.

    I would hook it back up stock, with a filter between the pump and the carb. It is a great little fuel system. As the guy's here will tell you, the carbs on these things really don't run well with a lot of pressure.

    Forget its a carb. Just think about it as a lot of small parts! There are some really good rebuilders out there. There is also some good help on You Tube.

  2. #22
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    If in doubt, you can contact Scoutpilot over at OldJeepcarbs.com He is one of the best carb specialists around.

  3. #23
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    I second the notion of keeping an original mechanical pump. There is a vacuum boost pump on there for the wipers that you don't get with an after market electric pump. Tens of thousands of vehicles ran millions of miles with them.. Now, even a new mechanical pump may deliver more fuel pressure than the carburetor likes, so don't discount needing a little fuel pressure regulator when you're done. (2 PSI is plenty).

    As for rebuilding a carburetor - go for it! Remember we said earlier not to fool with the water pump - later on there would be something worth rebuilding? Well this is the first project.

    Look at You Tube, Google "950SA Carburetor rebuild" and you will find all the information you need. Take pictures with your phone as you take it apart.

    Just watch out for the Dammit springs - the ones that go "sproing", fly across the bench and make you say "D......it"

  4. #24
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    And go get a gallon can of carburetor cleaner. It is good to clean up other parts too.

  5. #25
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    Hello Guys!!

    Well, I have installed a new water pump and no leaks. I also installed a new exhaust pipe from the first section after the manifold to include a new muffler. For now, I used the small tailpipe end, I will go for the fording extension in time.

    I have removed the driver seat and the fuel tank. I am cleaning it out. I also removed the fuel pump off the block. It is mechanical, but it is the wrong pump. It's a model 572-1614 Airtex for 1945-1958 jeeps. So, now I need to talk with Mike at Kaiser-Willys to try and get the correct one. I am going to go back to the OEM fuel system.

    Next, I need to tackle the brakes. I pushed the peddle and it went to the floor.

    I am looking for a passenger-side wiper motor and wiper? Anyone?

    I appreciate all the advice and knowledge all of you have given me, PLEASE KEEP IT UP!!!!

  6. #26
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    Great plan on going back to original on the fuel set up. I'm fairly certain that the A1s kept the vacuum wipers throughout the service run, so the original style of double acting fuel pump/vacuum pump will look and function properly.

    The brake going to the floor is a common issue, with a not so popular solution. Invest the funds and buy all brake parts new. From the master cylinder, lines, soft lines, and wheel cylinders. The second bit of advice is to purchase American made pieces. This will save you time and headaches by preventing fitment issues. I have heard that Crown has improved its quality of brake components, but I would still stick with domestic made Wagoner products.

  7. #27
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    Hi,
    So far I've gotten most of my parts from KaiserWillys.com. Parts have been good so far. I have gotten some parts from O'Riely's, but I haven't even begun the brakes yet. I am gonna finish the fuel pump and lines first. I want to have it running by Memorial Day, but who knows. I got the M38A1 so cheap, I don't mind putting some $$ in it.

  8. #28
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    If the Brakes Don't Stop It ...

    Quote Originally Posted by gmwillys View Post
    Invest the funds and buy all brake parts new.
    I second that notion. I never knew that the '48 could stop so well until I did the restoration and redid the brakes - and I've been driving it for over 60 years.

    Folks spend a lot of time to get their Jeep to run and look good, but there are times where there is a temptation to cut corners on brakes. You can't see the corrosion in the brake lines. The pitted wheel cylinders leak, just a little but they never get better. Brake drums may have been turned to their limit and then a bit more.

    Remember that phone commercial about things being "Good Enough"; "If the brakes don't stop it, something else will"? Not a good situation.

  9. #29
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    I just took a look at all four brakes. It looks like someone may have recently replaced them. They are in very good shape, no wheel cylinder leaks and plenty of pad. I am going to replace the lines and the master just in case.

  10. #30
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    The pedal to the floor could be the master cylinder seal for sure. However, you being in AZ, the location of the master cylinder needs a look. Heat was an issue with the location of the Master Cylinder, and the exhaust pipe from the manifold. It (exhaust) goes right under the master. Heat of course rises, from the pipe and in AZ the road! There is a heat shield that you should be sure is still there. It goes right under the Master. It is made of some form of insulating material. Most were left off on the first brake job. In AZ on parade in the heat of the sun, you may need it. The seals in the Master can cook and fail. Like wise setting in the AZ sun is tough on the wheel cylinder seals also. If you fill it up and hold pressure, and there's no leaks, Your good to go. The brakes on these are rudimentary and just good enough when in good mechanical condition. They are not going to be effective if any part of them is not up to par.

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