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Thread: New guy here

  1. #1
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    New guy here

    Hey guys and gals, Iím new to this forum. Have been lurking around for a few days, setting up an account etc. I bought a supposed to be Ď45 Jeep from a pawn shop about 11 years ago. Was delivered to Shreveport where we met and exchanged money for Jeep. Guy cranked it and we drove to my trailer then to home. Drove off trailer and around property, testing all gears low high 4 wheel etc. parked in big shop. Parked in shop and pulled out yesterday. This Jeep has been converted to run on propane. So put bottle to hose, primed, new battery, fired it up, also has been converted to 12 volts. Nothing works other than ignition system and engine seams to have good compression. Planing on just getting everything working. Then deciding what to do next. Itís a CJ2A #208286 should be 1948 model? Flat finder and 2 piece wind shield and hood. Everything else pretty much stock. My question is should I go ahead and convert back to gasoline or leave it with the propane. I can buy propane for $1.45 per gallon, burns clean, and I have access to over 1000 gallons of it in my large tank, and can fill small tanks at my leisure. Just donít know how much power Iíll be losing and at what distance can go on 20# tank. Have 2 other jeeps bought for parts. Ď53 round hood and another Ď48 with locked up engine and good frame trans. Etc. planning on pulling engine and overhauling etc. its just a year older than me so she has potential, what yíall think?

  2. #2
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    Hossfly, That little engine will run on anything. That being said, propane would be considered an "Overkill" fuel. If you have no problem handling it and are satisfied with the distance you can get on a tank full, why change. As a fuel it is kind to the motor. It takes a bit more of it to make the same power so you will burn more, less fuel mileage.

    The little L134 has very low compression much less than 7 to one. It needs very little octane, less than 80. The ideal compression ratio is in the 12.5- to 12.7- to-1 range for propane. If you wanted to get the best power with propane, you would boost the compression. You don't need to however. The propane isn't costing you any power, there is just more than stock available with a compression boost (which I would not do to a L134). Propane is high octane with a pump octane rating of 104. Propane typically works best with compression ratios of around 10.5 to 11 to 1. It is a "dry" fuel so it provides no valve lubrication. If the seats are not hardened it will wear them faster. It is a little easier on the rings however as there is no fuel wash. Very beneficial on cold starts and engine wear. Also, on extended storage, nothing beats natural or LP gas.
    Last edited by bmorgil; 04-15-2020 at 12:29 PM.

  3. #3
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    Bmorgil, yes I think I’ll leave it with propane for now.

    Changed the oil, filter cartridge, wiring, is a challenge with all types of inline fuses all over, no brakes at all. That’s next on list is to find master cyl. Think it’s below floor board, there is a removable plate, will investigate that.

    Engine cranks good, runs good, radiator no leaks so far. All gears seem to work. Fun project

    My goal is to get everything working then decide what’s next. Love working on these old jeeps.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    Hossfly, a very achievable goal. These little things lend themselves well to restoration. If you don't already have one, the Universal Jeep Service Manual is a must have. I couldn't imagine a restore without it.

    https://www.kaiserwillys.com/vehicle...-cj-2a-3a-3b-5

  5. #5
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    Welcome Hossfly!

    I agree with leaving the Propane just for the simple fact you can run cheap, then the added benefit that the engine will be a whole lot cleaner running. As Bmorgil stated, you may see valve and seat wear, but I believe that the benefits will out weigh the costs.

  6. #6
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    And you can fill at the house non tax.

  7. #7
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    You never really know on the seats until you tear it down. It is quite possible they are already hardened. There is some indication that even in early engines destine for industrial or, hard use, the seats were hardened. The L34's are Continental based engines. Some Continental components interchange with the 134. The Continentals were all Industrial type engines used in equipment. Some machinist say they tear down these old motors Continental and Willys, and they find the seats are hardened. I don't think any of the old motors had stainless valves however.

    In any event, I don't think you will see any issues until you get a good 50,000 or so hard miles on it with propane. Then you may see some compression loss. This is not a high combustion temperature, high RPM engine. Valve spring pressure is minimal. The exhaust valve sees the most wear and it is somewhat isolated from flame in the Flathead. I don't think you will ever need to worry.

  8. #8
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    I finally got the master cylinder out from the frame rail. Someone in the past installed a plastic reservoir lid and it was so tight, it wouldn’t budge even with a 3/4’ break over and 1-1/8’ 6 point socket. Soaked for 48 hrs. In Ed’s Red. Had to almost melt with torch while trying with said wrench and Channel lock pliers, finally got it to move. NAPA has repair kit to rebuild, so that’s next. Love these old girls.

  9. #9
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    You may just want to consider a complete rebuilt master cylinder. Usually those old master cylinders are are so bad inside they will never seal up for you.

    https://www.kaiserwillys.com/vehicle...ster-cylinders

  10. #10
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    Master Cylinder

    Quote Originally Posted by bmorgil View Post
    You may just want to consider a complete rebuilt master cylinder. Usually those old master cylinders are are so bad inside they will never seal up for you.

    https://www.kaiserwillys.com/vehicle...ster-cylinders
    I'd look it over very closely before you decide to rebuild. DOT-3 brake fluid goes out and tries to find water to absorb into the system and then lets it sit at low places and corrode things. (It is very "hygroscopic"). The master cylinder is usually the low place in the system.

    If there is any corrosion in the bore, you won't be able to get a good pedal.

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