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Thread: Ham's '48 - Movin' Right Along

  1. #1
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    Ham's '48 - Movin' Right Along

    Things are going almost too smoothly for a change.

    After a flurry of things that needed to be looked at or worked on, the truck has settled down to a point that seems eerie. The differential vent leak is fixed and for the first time in several years there are no significant piddles under the back end of the truck.

    I had new boots put on the U-joints (and all of the needle bearings installed in the trunnions), then I had the driveshaft straightened and balanced; that reduced vibrations a bit. The last step in the vibration project was to have all four wheels dynamically balanced.

    After a first spin, the balance tech asked me if it would be OK to use external clamp-on weights, inside glue-ons weren't going to cut it for those tires and rims. I answered ďSure Ė clamp-on weights are absolutely correct for a 1948 truckĒ. It took a lot of big weights, but all four wheels are as good as they are going to be. The old guy in the shop made the comment that 72-year old rims usually are not as true as modern rims so there is some unbalance due to the rims themselves. But, I am pleased with how the project ended up. There is a bit of a shudder at 30 MPH Ė I tell folks itís like weíre breaking the sound barrier. Once we get through it, itís a smooth ride!

    The last major annoyance was the oil pressure anomaly. You folks with mechanical or crossed coil gauges just donít have the thrill factor associated with the bi-metal Stewart-Warner gauges. At ignition turn-on, it will take about 15 seconds for the oil pressure gauge to move from pegged below zero up to its no pressure point. Then, at engine start the needle starts to casually move upscale. It can take a good 30 to 45 seconds to move up to idle pressure. I donít know about you guys, but Iíd like to know immediately if I have good oil pressure. During that minute, you use your ears to listen for the low oil noises.

    But Ė my problem was that after about five or ten minutes on the road, oil pressure would start to slowly drop off, then return to normal fairly quickly. Once you see oil pressure dropping, you get gauge fixation; you watch that gauge as much as you watch the road. Then it would move back up, maybe drop again a couple of times and then settle down. This is unnerving to say the least.

    But, one quarantine day I got serious with the ohmmeter and crawled up under the dash and after a while, it turned out that the oil pressure sensor was intermittent. It should be about 50-ohms at zero pressure, and 25-ohms at 30 PSI, but it would intermittently go open then go back to normal. The slow response time of the gauge made it look like I was slowly losing oil pressure - not the case at all. WHEW!

    Mike at KWAS had a replacement sensor and after about 30-minutes under the truck, things were back together. The new sensor reads a bit differently that the old one, but it stays steady while Iím going down the road.

    Over the last week Iíve probably made two road trips and several putter-abouts and everything is good. Iíll do an oil change, then I take the truck back to the body shop for a touch-up next week. We have a spot in the July 4th Parade, so some sort of normal is resuming.
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    When I got mine running, I had put in a new SW mechanical gauge and I noticed the oil pressure drops back as the engine gets hotter. I think that is pretty common on older stuff. I have had tractors that did that. Wheels look great!

  3. #3
    Senior Member 5JeepsAz's Avatar
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    Electrifying. It actually works? Happy for you! That oil pressure thing alarms people. So do gauges. That's why I ignore both and thank God for mechanics.

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    Senior Member TJones's Avatar
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    Wheels look Great Larry, I’m getting close to crunch time on mine.
    Hopefully in a week or so until she’s ready to fire up!!!

  5. #5
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    Send some pictures of the parade for sure. Can't wait to see Ham's 48 back in form!

  6. #6
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    Ham's '48 - Still Movin' Along

    Quote Originally Posted by bmorgil View Post
    Send some pictures of the parade for sure. Can't wait to see Ham's 48 back in form!
    The body shop/beauty appointment for touch-up keeps getting put back a week at a time.

    He is just so backed up he literally can't get it in the door. Problems started with the GM strike - pieces and parts supplies got cut off. Then, when the strike ended, GM production got first allocations of pieces. Just about the time body parts began to come off back-order, along came the Woo-Hoo Flu and shut down suppliers and distribution again. He has sent out several vehicles without grilles and other non-functional parts just to get them back in service and out of the shop.

    Vehicles that can't get moved out get covered up and occupy shop floor space. So, next Monday looks pretty solid - right now.

    But, in the meantime I did the bi-annual oil change. That truck has NEVER had such an expensive oil change; five quarts of Valvoline VR-1, 10W-30. None of the auto box stores had VR-1, I had to go to NAPA to find six quarts at one place. I changed the cartridge filter and I even siphoned out that oil that won't drain out of the bottom of the filter cannister. (A mouth full of warm motor oil isn't as disgusting as a mouth full of gasoline when you are trying to start the siphon).

  7. #7
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    VR-1 is real good stuff. You get what you pay for. I doubt it needs that change bi-annually. More like every 5000 miles or 3 years would work real well on Ham's 48 and your pocket book. VR-1 can certainly handle those intervals.

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    A douche bag might work to get that extra oil out of that cannister.

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    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    Cleaning out the oil

    Quote Originally Posted by okiemark View Post
    A douche bag might work to get that extra oil out of that cannister.
    After one of the wife's surgeries I accumulated a large bulb syringe (think BIG turkey baster). I use it to fill the sump pump battery with distilled water, but I didn't want to contaminate it with oil - so the redneck approach.
    Last edited by LarrBeard; 06-09-2020 at 08:47 PM.

  10. #10
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    The 30W oil I drained out was clean enough I seriously considered keeping it for the lawn mowers, but I drained it into the recycle tub.

    It's not like I'm changing it every 3 or 4 months - the pocket book isn't hurt that badly. The counter guy asked me "Why do you need racing oil for an old Jeep?", so I passed along your learning to him. I'm not sure he understood ...

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