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Thread: Engine re-build

  1. #1
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    Engine re-build

    Any recommendations of a good 134L engine re-builder in the central Indiana area? Engine has not been run in years, but turns over and had no foreign matter in the oil or anti-freeze. Compression is 50-50-50-75.

  2. #2
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    I am even wondering if I need a rebuild. I had re-seated the valves, had one seat replaced and all 8 valves seam to have seated clean. The mains looked good when I
    looked at them when installing new seals, almost no ridge at top of cylinders and can still see some hone marks on walls. Pistons are marked .040. Thinking I should just pull pistons and look at rings.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    There is a good discussion here on compression ratio and what to expect. On a stone cold engine, follow the procedure in the Jeep Field manual. You are looking for two things.

    1) the compression needs to come up quickly to a number within reason. The manual explains this well. You are only looking at 4 compression strokes. The more it takes to get to the peak number (max 4 strokes), the worse the condition of the rings/bore. So if it pumps up to 50 in 2 strokes and holds there, that is a good indication. If it takes it all 4 strokes to get to 50 that's a bad thing.

    2) Some uniformity between cylinders, You want them to all be acting the same. Higher compression in one cylinder than the others can indicate a few things.

    The manual does a great job of using a compression tester to check the condition of the cylinder seal. I highly recommend that process. Compression is affected by a lot of things. Checking a cold engine for maximum pressure (the specification you read in the manual that says 100 psi) will yield unusable results. You will need to warm it up to operating temperature and take an immediate reading, to try to get to that one. The 100 psi spec is truly more of a mathematical specification. You would be hard pressed to get it on a cold used engine. When maximum 4 compression stroke cranking pressure, drops really low (below 80 psi on a warm engine), it will be hard to start (a cold engine). I would carefully follow the complete process outlined in the Jeep field manual. It will tell you a lot about whether or not it needs a new cylinder seal.

    Look in The SERVICE MANUAL FOR UNIVERSAL JEEP VEHICLES Engine Tune Up Paragraph C-7 for a great way to use a single gauge to check the condition of a cylinder seal. It is the "old school way" and a damn good one.
    Last edited by bmorgil; 08-03-2020 at 07:26 AM.

  4. #4
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    Jeepvergin, There is a fantastic engine re builder in Cecil Ohio northwest at the top by IN.line. HARTS Automotive. They do every thing from Model A's to Diesels.
    If its a engine the can do it. Re grind Cranks , re grind camshafts, bore , center line boring ect.
    Give them a call

  5. #5
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    I use Harts Automotive exclusively. John is my go to machinist for everything. There isn't any and I mean any engine he isn't capable of doing. In fact when he was machining my L134 for peeJ, he had a crankshaft out of an ocean freighter in there! He machines the Top tractor puller motors there. My son and I are treated to a guided walk through of some of the rarest engines you will ever see every time we stop in. I drive 1 and 1/2 hours one way to use him. Some real one of a kind stuff. People ship their components to him from all over the world to machine.

    I used to used Fall Machine in Toledo for all my stuff but he retired. He was a legendary machinist. He was meticulous. As good as it gets. I asked him where do I go now? I have stroker motors and truck motors and offshore boat motors and soon a few dragster motors. He said go to Harts no where else for you.

    Needless to say my L134 block is sonic tested, bored, honed, decked and valve seats, the head is flattened and the crank and rods reconditioned and balanced all at Harts. Man it runs good.
    Last edited by bmorgil; 08-31-2020 at 07:15 PM.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    Good machine shops are few and far between. Great ones are almost extinct. Sounds like I'm sold on making the trip to Hart's if I ever need anything done. There are no good ones left in my region, at least that I trust.

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    Don't be disappointed when you see the place, its in the very little town of Cecil . Like bmorgil said fantastic shop. I had the privilege to take a tour of the shop 30 yrs ago . Back then he told me it was a million dollar + shop. If it can be done, Hart's can do it. Kind of like visiting the 60's LOL

  8. #8
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    Some of the best machine shops and radiator shops are complete dumps. Junk piled up all over, but the old guy knows what and where everything is. Love those places, and love hearing their stories.

  9. #9
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    I will have to take some photo's of John's shop. It is just like walking into a 1960 movie. Old stuff everywhere. Rare motors and parts are scattered about. Hundreds of antique motors. Old school Hemi's, Model A motors, hand cast poured tractor puller motors everything. The last time I was there the boy's were way in the back in the "special" shop pouring model A Ford babbit bearings into the block. When is the last time you saw that done!

  10. #10
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    It's been a long while since I've watched someone pour Babbits. We had a local guy that had done some experimental R&D for both GM then Chrysler. For the life of me I can not remember his name. We always called him 17, because he would always start off a story saying back in '17. He worked out of an Quonset hut next to the Burlington Northern train tracks/station. He had pallet racks full of unmarked cams and odds and ends. You could pick one up, and hold it out and he could tell you what it went to and to what duration it was ground to just by glancing at it. He ran the Arca circuit for a while then spent his retirement building dirt track and tractor engines. In the corner next to his vertical mill was a engine block on a stand. It was his most prized possession. It was a nickel block 327 SBC that he worked while at the General. When he passed, a guy that we raced with bought it for a song from his estate sale.

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