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Thread: Virtual Willys MB

  1. #91
    Senior Member 5JeepsAz's Avatar
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    I like this. An expert panel at work, providing appropriate guidance to the genius at work. BB did you say this is not actually building the model yet. This is like a dry run? Because there's a market for the first mock up guaranteed. dont be throwing stuff out!

  2. #92
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    The only thing in those photos that would give away the fact that we are not looking at a real chassis is the jackstands. They need to be two or three colors, a bit rusty and scratched up.

    You could Photoshop that in a picture of GMWilly's driveway and people would believe he has another project under way.

  3. #93
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmwillys View Post
    But with nobody arguing who has the better design....
    It's called "Preliminary Concept Review"; Been there; refereed that - several times.

  4. #94
    Quote Originally Posted by gmwillys View Post
    Looking good BB. Just think where technology will be in another 10 years.
    I agree 10 years is quite a long time. 10 years ago, in the hobbyist guitar building space a CNC was an odd view. It was considered cheating. A lot less mojo in a guitar cut by a machine holding the router instead of a human holding the router. Go figure. Anyways, 6 Years ago I built my CNC, sold it in January. CNC is now considered another normal tool in the arsenal of guitar building.

    It's the same with 3D printing, as price goes down, and quality of parts goes up, in ten years, a 3D printer will be a common household appliance. People will print parts instead of buying them. Specialized website already offer millions of 3D printable designs for free. No need to learn to design. All you need to do is search and print.

    Quote Originally Posted by bmorgil View Post
    This is just like stepping into an engineering meeting on the chassis!
    That is a fun thought.


    Quote Originally Posted by 5JeepsAz View Post
    I like this. An expert panel at work, providing appropriate guidance to the genius at work. BB did you say this is not actually building the model yet. This is like a dry run? Because there's a market for the first mock up guaranteed. dont be throwing stuff out!
    It's a good thing I have all of you as expert to help me. I'm only a copycat. Wouldn't be able to come up with a design on my own. Mechanical concept and movement amazes me, but I have little understanding of them.

    It's a work in progress. Parts that do no longer fit are discarded. Today I should start printing the current version of the frame in 1:6 scale because I modified the shock brackets. The old ones will be thrown away. I'm keeping the actual crossmembers. So there is no actual mockup to keep. Random pieces here and there being replaced as I go. I'm going to end up with a box full of miscellaneous parts that do not fit together. Are you suggesting I hold to them? I already have discarded the first revision of parts.

    Quote Originally Posted by LarrBeard View Post
    The only thing in those photos that would give away the fact that we are not looking at a real chassis is the jackstands. They need to be two or three colors, a bit rusty and scratched up.

    You could Photoshop that in a picture of GMWilly's driveway and people would believe he has another project under way.
    I need to print bigger jackstand for the 1:6 scale and wanted to paint them red and black. Some people are taking this miniature world very seriously.

    Here's a picture of someone's miniature garage tools.

    098.jpg

    Printed the 1:6 scale spring. I'm still impressed by the difference in size of the two scales. The spring takes all the print bed space. I love that scale because it looks even more realistic.

    097.jpg

  5. #95
    Could not resist showing a picture of the 1:6 spring next to the 1:10 frame

    099.jpg

    I also forgot to mention that it took over 9 hours to print the 4 springs.

  6. #96
    Senior Member 5JeepsAz's Avatar
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    I was just saying I might buy the mock up, actually.but I didn't want to go there because there are others around here who might want it too! Everytime I see your progress it's amazing.

  7. #97
    Senior Member TJones's Avatar
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    What a amazing job your doing BB!!!

  8. #98
    Quote Originally Posted by 5JeepsAz View Post
    I was just saying I might buy the mock up, actually.but I didn't want to go there because there are others around here who might want it too! Everytime I see your progress it's amazing.
    I don't know if my process of gradually upgrading parts will lead me to have a partial mockup at some point. If so, I will keep it. I'm happy that you are appreciating the process of building the MB as much as I am. I appreciate all your feedback. Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by TJones View Post
    What a amazing job your doing BB!!!
    Thank you TJ, glad you like it.

    I hope I'm not boring you all with all the details about the software. I really like Fusion 360 and it's many features. This time I will tell you about two other features that are time savers.

    The first one is the ability to pattern a portion of the design.

    As you all know, the MB wheels were made in two parts to allow a tire change in the field with simple tools. I think this next feature only purpose is to align both parts of the wheels together.

    100.JPG

    I designed a small box to which I also applied some filets to blend it better.

    Then I use the pattern command to repeat this feature 4 times around the wheel. On the right you see the parameters I can play with. I chose to pattern a feature. Features are part of the design that you can find in the timeline. The timeline is the bottom row of icons which represent every operations done on the design. In this case, the alignement box (for lack of proper word) is composed of three operations. The first one is the extrusion as a square box as shown in the picture above. The other two are the filet operations. These are called features. So to pattern them, I need to select all three of them for the parts to be repeated properly.

    101.jpg

    When I click ok, I get 4 identical alignement boxes. This is way better than designing, extruding and applying filet to each of them individually, .

    102.JPG

    The next command that is great is the Combine tool. It allows to join or cut parts from other parts.

    In this case, I added protrusion on the back of the wheel, now the front of the wheel will not slide in place as it will bump on the new alignement boxes. I need to cut the inside rim to allow the box to go in. I could go the hard way and design boxes around with the proper size and cut the front wheel portion. But the Combine tool allows me to select the front wheel as a target for the operation and the back wheel as the tool body. You can see in this picture that the front wheel is in blue and the back wheel is in red.

    103.JPG

    The red means that it will cut the blue portion.

    When I click OK, I have a perfect front wheel that will fit perfectly.

    104.JPG

    No hassles. The best part is that I can make changes to the alignement box and it will automatically repeat itself around the wheels and cut the front wheel with any modifications I apply to it. That is the inherent beauty of having the history captured at every step of the design. It means that I can go back in time make a change and it will propagate in the future. Very cool tool.
    Last edited by bluesblooded; 09-23-2020 at 07:07 AM.

  9. #99
    I used the same pattern process to make the screw holes that will keep the two part of the wheels together.

    105.JPG 106.JPG

    I also started to work on the gear housing. As I mentioned in one the earlier post this is one of the parts I think will be harder to model.

    This is what I have so far. You can see the rough primitive shapes that will make up the housing.

    107.JPG 108.jpg

  10. #100
    I have a question for you Willys experts.

    The look of rear axle has been bothering me since the start.

    109.JPG

    It's seems it looks too fat. I've given it a diameter of 10mm, so the 1:1 dimension would be 100mm or a little less than 4 inches. Am I in the ball park?

    I've made a few tests like here it is with 8mm or in 1:1 scale 3 1/8in

    110.JPG

    The downside is that you can see in the timeline that changing the size to 8mm gives a bunch of errors I need to address (yellow and red).

    If 8mm is the way to go, I have a couple of options.

    If I rebuild the axle at 8mm, I need to change the spring curvature because as you can see, it would not touch the bottom of the spring and will need to fix whatever errors that will come down the line.

    111.JPG

    One cheat I could do that would keep the spring as is and not provoke any kind of errors down the timeline would be to leave it at 10mm as it is but thin it down between the gear housing and the brackets and between the brackets and the wheels. Keeping the 10mm diameter at the spring only. Like if I added a 2mm bushing around the axle at the spring location. Something like this.

    113.JPG

    If someone could give me the proper diameter of the axle, it would help me make the best decision to handle this.

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