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Thread: Newbie with a MB

  1. #41
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    Thanks for the intel @bmorgil!

  2. #42
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    So, as I'm been seeing for the past year, when you have a success with your Willys, something else pops up......

    Brought the jeep to the National Infantry Museum last Saturday to show her off & educate some of our new Infantry Trainees on the Jeep - took her for a ride afterwards [about 2 miiles] & as i was pulling up to load her back into the trailer, the brakes locked up & could not depress the brake pedal at all

    Did get it into the trailer & did some quick troubleshooting; the front driver's side wheel rim was warm where the other three wheels were not; thinking this might be the brake lines & probably a good idea to bleed the brake lines / check the master cylinder?

    As always, appreciate everyone's input on this

    Thanks!

    IMG_4119.jpg

    *parked in fron of the National Infantry Museum last Saturday

  3. #43
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    Lewis 505,

    Start with the soft line going from the axle to the frame. Rubber lines are notorious for collapsing internally, and not allowing the line pressure to return to the reservoir, causing the brake to be applied without the pedal being pushed. With the hard pedal I would lean that direction. The force required to apply the brakes overcomes the collapse of the line, but the return to the master does not have any pressure to force its way back.

  4. #44
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    Thanks to @gmwillys for the intel above; we have the Jeep at the Auto Skills center on-post & stopped by today to check on progress; one of the mechanics stated that there's a special tool used to adjust the bolt highlighted on the attached picture - any ideas?

    Thanks! InkedIMG_4273_LI.jpg

  5. #45
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    Lewis 505,

    No real special tools required outside of an offset set of boxed end wrenches. The top jam nuts are 9/16", while the bottom jam nuts are 3/4". The center bolt needs an open end wrench to turn/hold the adjuster (eccentric). As seen in the photos, mine are worn down so I ended up using a pair of vise grips to hold or turn the eccentric bolt. Then a feeler gage can be used to set the shoes to the drum by running the gage through the front of the drum as shown in the first picture. I set them at .010" as a base number depending on the condition of the brake shoes. It is not the most user friendly set up, and it will take some time to get right being that on this set up you have four adjustments per wheel, (two upper and two lower). When you are confident that all is adjusted correctly, apply a little Loctite to the jam nuts and tighten the crap out of them to ensure that the adjustment doesn't move when stopping hard.
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    Last edited by gmwillys; 04-02-2021 at 05:44 AM.

  6. #46
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    gm has you going in the right path. I have a tool drawn up to make, I just haven't gotten around to the machine shop yet. Here is a photo of what I use. The lower jam nuts up front are the worst. Depending on the wrenches you have it can be impossible. On those I took a 3/4" China Freight drop box wrench, and ground the sides down slim. It works much better on those front brakes. Also the newer aftermarket drums may not have the slots gm is speaking of. In that case you have to use the old adjust it till it drags and back it off a touch. If you have to pay extra for the drums with the slot, I would do it. gm is aware I might be banging my head with some aftermarket drums right now!

    A couple of links for tools.

    http://chryslerjeepfordgpw.com/en/ma..._usa_made.html

    https://www.willysjeepparts.com/Brake_Service_Tools.htm
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #47
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    I was reviewing the thread and I caught a note from back in February:

    "... installed a new fuel filter between the gas tank & fuel pump - hopefully this does the trick & will keep you posted!"

    The best place for a filter is between the fuel pump and the carburetor. My first thought was the same as yours, keep the crud out of the pump as well as the carburetor, but the wiser ones here taught me that the diaphragm pumps do a better job of pushing fuel out to the carburetor than they do sucking it down that line from the tank.

    The MB isn't as much an issue as the trucks and wagons, but if you get just a little crud in the filter, the pump may have problems generating enough suction to draw fuel to the system.

    If it's running well, no immediate problem - just a suggestion for something to look at later; once you get that brake unstuck!

  8. #48
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    Good catch Larry, yes if there is a restriction on the suction side, it will starve for fuel and it can be hard on the pump. A "no restriction" screen is usually right at the pickup in the tank.

  9. #49
    Senior Member TJones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmorgil View Post
    gm has you going in the right path. I have a tool drawn up to make, I just haven't gotten around to the machine shop yet. Here is a photo of what I use. The lower jam nuts up front are the worst. Depending on the wrenches you have it can be impossible. On those I took a 3/4" China Freight drop box wrench, and ground the sides down slim. It works much better on those front brakes. Also the newer aftermarket drums may not have the slots gm is speaking of. In that case you have to use the old adjust it till it drags and back it off a touch. If you have to pay extra for the drums with the slot, I would do it. gm is aware I might be banging my head with some aftermarket drums right now!

    A couple of links for tools.

    http://chryslerjeepfordgpw.com/en/ma..._usa_made.html

    https://www.willysjeepparts.com/Brake_Service_Tools.htm
    Am I missing something here??
    My 11" brakes off a 46 Pickup do not have the bottom adjusters, maybe Larrbeard can jump in...
    Do your brakes only have adjusters on the top Larry?
    I had to out and look at mine just to make sure they didn't have both, you guys really threw me for a loop when you said a 3/4" wrench

  10. #50
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    9" brakes vs 11" brakes are a huge difference. There are a few different brakes out there. We are speaking of the 9" Bendix style found on the early Military and CJ's. They are very touchy and difficult to adjust because they are so tight behind the knuckles up front on a Dana 25. They have a bottom adjuster and a top adjuster on both shoes. 4 adjustments per wheel.
    Last edited by bmorgil; 04-02-2021 at 08:32 AM.

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