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Thread: Tornado 230 OHC she's milky pls help diagnosing

  1. #1
    Senior Member 5JeepsAz's Avatar
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    Tornado 230 OHC she's milky pls help diagnosing

    Milky oil at dipstick. Tornado 230 stock except for vacuum cannister add and a/c add and disc brake MC add. Underneath checks out. Timing cover checks out. Down to removing the header. Either its a flaw in the block or somehow the cross feed is mixing oil and coolant. Help please and appreciated. ?

    Edit: one suggestion was check PCV (keep you posted on this)
    Last edited by 5JeepsAz; 05-27-2021 at 03:02 PM.

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    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    Az, take it down to the shop and have them pressure check it. We are looking to be sure it didn't blow a head gasket. Barring that I would say a little condensation got in the oil. Has it been going on short runs? Hot days and cool desert nights? Did you wash off the engine with a lot of water? If it passes the pressure check change the oil. Or change the oil and roll the dice that all is good and you didn't waste an oil change.

    The oil needs to get warm enough to vaporize the normal condensation that occurs. Contrary to popular belief cool oil is not a good thing. You need to bring the oil up to temperature once and a while to keep the water boiled out. It would be great to run the oil above 212 deg. for most of the time.
    Last edited by bmorgil; 05-27-2021 at 01:09 PM.

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    Senior Member 5JeepsAz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmorgil View Post
    Az, take it down to the shop and have them pressure check it. We are looking to be sure it didn't blow a head gasket. Barring that I would say a little condensation got in the oil. Has it been going on short runs? Hot days and cool desert nights? Did you wash off the engine with a lot of water? If it passes the pressure check change the oil. Or change the oil and roll the dice that all is good and you didn't waste an oil change.

    The oil needs to get warm enough to vaporize the normal condensation that occurs. Contrary to popular belief cool oil is not a good thing. You need to bring the oil up to temperature once and a while to keep the water boiled out. It would be great to run the oil above 212 deg. for most of the time.
    Thank you - yes it is in shop already for a clutch. Said why not change the oil while it's in there. It was milky. Thus the hunt. They did say they found two more oil leaks. So that it good. They are checking the presuure and I'll keep you posted. ..

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    No need to hit the boiling point for water to evaporate. Generally speaking, 180F is plenty high enough to evaporate the water out of the oil. The rule of thumb in aviation is operating temp for 30 minutes and people try hard to keep the oil temp 180200F.
    Jeff
    '51 CJ3A
    '47 CJ2A

  5. #5
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    Agreed Jeff, warm is key. 180 to 220 deg f is usually the agreed upon optimum oil operating range most companies concur on. Most high performance engine builders would also like to see for a dual-purpose car, engine oil of at least 220 degrees F to burn off all the deposits and water. Of course it varies a little depending on the lube. I have seen NASCAR engines run at 300 for a long time. They wish they could cool it down! Synthetics are an amazing thing.

    Usually in a motor vehicle the oil will run 10 to 20 degrees hotter than the water. In a classic Jeep running a 165 thermostat, it becomes a little more important to change the oil out if it shows any signs of water. This is one of the reasons oil changes are recommended based on time. It is going to be mighty tough to hit these temperatures in a lot of applications (grandmas grocery car). So there are anti corrosive additives and a recommendation to change it after a certain time frame. Oil that doesn't get warmed enough accumulates sulfur among other things. Sulfur is the anti-bearing!
    Last edited by bmorgil; 05-28-2021 at 06:26 AM.

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    Lubes and metallurgy have come a long way. I remember when it was time to get rid of a vehicle or overhaul the engine when it hit 100,000 miles. It was a sin to drive one more than 3500 miles without an oil change and tuneups were almost as common. The F150 STX (4.6L) I drive now is pushing 210,000 miles on 5000 mile oil changes and 2 spark plug changes. I half expect to get another 200,000 miles out of it.
    Jeff
    '51 CJ3A
    '47 CJ2A

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    Senior Member 5JeepsAz's Avatar
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    Thank you.. Love the knowledge. Bmorgil, ignoring your illustrious warning about Sulphur problems. In fact, I'm adding the sulpher smell to the fence post as a smell thief deterrent - the Sulphur smell approach".

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    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    That stogie of yours produces enough sulfur to keep more than the fence away! Just pull that choke AZ..... pull that choke.

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    Senior Member TJones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 51 CJ3 View Post
    Lubes and metallurgy have come a long way. I remember when it was time to get rid of a vehicle or overhaul the engine when it hit 100,000 miles. It was a sin to drive one more than 3500 miles without an oil change and tuneups were almost as common. The F150 STX (4.6L) I drive now is pushing 210,000 miles on 5000 mile oil changes and 2 spark plug changes. I half expect to get another 200,000 miles out of it.
    Your right CJ about lubes coming a long way!!
    I’ve got a Dodge Ram 1500 I bought new in 2014 and Pro Car the engine guru who built the motor in the Orange Crate is a Amsoil dealer. He convinced me to drain the oil on it when it had 22 miles on it and switch to 5W-20W Synthetic Amsoil.
    I asked him how often I should change it and he called his factory rep and they said if I’m not going to go 12,000 miles between oil changes don’t waste my money. Granite it’s not cheap ( like $60.00 for 2.5 gallons ) but it’s worth it in the long haul.
    The Black beauty has 133,000 miles on it now and doesn’t burn a drop between oil changes and still runs like it did on day one.
    So I agree lubes have come a long way!!

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    Senior Member 5JeepsAz's Avatar
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    No idea how I missed these posts! My apologies. I must have been visiting Cindy and smoking inside the interior with the windows closed to improve the fragrance for when I get her back from the shop. She almost smelled clean when I put my nose in the window to smell her up. Hey - check out these engine pictures! They've pulled all kinds of wires and plugs off and left the beauty of the OHC visible for all to see. Apparently, the one part passed a "block compression test" and the other parts are getting cleaned up and gasket checked. If it's still dripping coolant fluid into the oil pan then it's off engine-matic for a refurbished head something to identify and repair any topside cracks in the metal pieces in the engine so they wont leak anymore.
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