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Thread: 61 CJ5 Resto Restart Info

  1. #31
    Thanks for your help, guys! Much appreciated. I'll get a better look at the brakes as soon as I can. My plan all along was to trailer it home. It's a 2 hour drive over a few passes so I don't intend to drive it. I really just want to be able to stop when I put it on the trailer and then when I get it into my shop. And, assuming I can put it into low range, I know I won't be going too very fast, so up to this point I really wasn't worried about brakes, figuring I could get it to stop if I put a few blocks down. I might still do that if the brake issue is very bad. But, if it turns out that the brake issue is relatively minor, I may try to do something with it.

    Regarding a tow bar or two wheel car dolly, I hadn't considered doing that since I was somewhat concerned about the wheel bearings being dry and causing me problems on the way. Would you guys be concerned with that or not? Sounds like you've got some experience doing this on older Jeeps, so maybe I'm worrying needlessly?

  2. #32
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    I like your caution and your approach. I agree on the bearings. Trailering it would be my preferred way for a 2 hour mountain ride. If it was just a hop across town at low speed I would be very tempted to pull or push it. I would remove the driveshafts, roll it and listen for any sound that wasn't "normal". A trailer is the best way to go with unknowns. My luck a leaf spring would break and stop all the fun!

    When you are sure of the bearings and general mechanical condition, with a tow bar and locking front hubs, you can tow bar them anywhere. Just unlock the front hubs and remove the rear driveshaft. They will roll forever, like a trailer with a windshield. Every now and then you will see a CJ stuck to the back of an R.V..
    Last edited by bmorgil; 08-24-2021 at 12:29 PM.

  3. #33
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    On my 2A, the rear axle has a grease fitting on each side for the axle bearing, I've never thought of looking on the '63 wagon to see if they were still in use in later models. Dr. Dana will know for sure. A few pumps of grease would be enough, but don't over do it because you can pump too much in and push grease through the axle seal into the brakes. Then follow Bmorgil' s advice with the removal of the drive shaft.

  4. #34
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    The axle was the same as far as the grease zerk until about '75 when they went to the one piece axle and flange. The grease zerk is a "flow through" set up. There is a tiny hole on the opposite side of the axle tube from the grease zerk. Pump in grease until it comes out of the tiny hole in the axle tube. Be sure that tiny hole is clear or you will push grease past the seal as gm warns about.

    If you don't have hub locks you would remove both driveshafts (front and rear) if you were gong to pull it down the road. I still like the idea of the trailer. Just in case a rotating bearing somewhere might seize up in a 2 hour run, and ruin something that was repairable.
    Last edited by bmorgil; 08-24-2021 at 05:21 PM.

  5. #35
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    I have to find the link again, but there was an article in 4 Wheeler where they mounted lock out hubs on the rear axle for flat towing.

    An added bit of hard learned information.... If one where to flat tow a Jeep, you have to use a heavier vehicle to pull the Jeep. If you use a vehicle of the same weight, the Heep will not steer back straight after a turn. An S10 Blazer is a prime example of what not to pull a jeep with. The Blazer doesn't have enough arse end weight to make the Jeep track behind.

  6. #36
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    Power is better but I have used a come-along to winch vehicles onto trailers.

    I used to do a lot of rock crawling and I could drive all day and never touch the clutch and seldom use the brakes. I think I would probably use those tactics to load onto a trailer if engine starts and stops properly. It would be a good idea to practice a little before getting into a confined space with no outs.

    My CJ5 liked to break the clutch linkage at the worst times. After having to cross downtown Tucson without a clutch, I always carried a spare clutch cable adjuster. I think that problem was common to the V6 CJ5.
    Jeff
    '51 CJ3A
    '47 CJ2A

  7. #37
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    I think you are all over it Jeff... Power! A trailer with a winch solves all things. It sounds like you are in a position to get it done. In your Crawler you were probably pretty sure there was nothing to prevent you from putting the power to it and crawling up. Since the mechanical condition of this thing is unknown, I like the winch idea even more. You would hate to blow it up in the middle of the whole deal!

  8. #38
    Great input guys! Thanks.

    I'm confident that I can get it running and under its own power once I put the new fuel pump in. Then I'll see if it will roll and make sure there isn't something else that would prevent me from getting it on the trailer. I hadn't thought of this before, but I do have my other 83 CJ5 in the same location and could potentially use its winch to winch the 61 onto the trailer, if necessary. I just have to make sure I can handle it once I get it back to my house since the 83 won't be there then.

    One other question: The new fuel pump was just delivered and it got me to thinking about whether or not I need to prime the pump before I install it. Any thoughts on how to do that if necessary?

  9. #39
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    No need Jeff. If there is fuel in the float bowl it will run long enough to get the pump going. It just takes it a few seconds once the engine fires.

  10. #40
    Perfect! Thanks!

    And I'm not Jeff - My name is Paul.

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