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Thread: 61 CJ5 Resto Restart Info

  1. #11
    Weekend update: First, I got the fuel line disconnected from the gas tank and removed the tank. Put my cleaner in and swished it around a bit and poured it out. The cleaner is meant to be mixed with gasoline, so I'm not worried about contaminating the tank. Nothing much came out. No sign of sludge or rust flakes, etc. Just the cleaner that turned a bit brown color. I put more cleaner in and let it sit overnight. Came out the next day and while just slightly brownish, the cleaner that poured out looked pretty good. I was pretty pleased with that. I put the tank back in the jeep and replaced the drivers seat.

    Next, I drained the oil. Old oil just looked dark, no signs of contaminants or water. Refilled with clean oil.

    Filled radiator with new coolant. Took about 2 gallons. No leaks apparent. Same level in radiator after 24 hours.

    Disconnected all gas lines from tank to pump and pump to carburetor and sprayed carb cleaner through each line. No clogs, no gunk, everything looks good.

    Removed air hose from carb and looked inside carburetor. All looked really clean. Sprayed carb cleaner all around just for the heck of it.

    Removed distributor cap and inspected everything. It all looks pristine. Rotor, cap, points, condenser, all look like they are brand new. Was quite happy to see that.

    Replaced spark plugs with new plugs with proper gap.

    I didn't have time to remove the valve cover and lubricate things there, but other than that, I think I'm about ready to give it a try and try starting it.

    I do have a couple of questions, though. When I go to start it and assuming that the starter works and it cranks the engine, would you recommend that I pour any gas or starter fluid in the carb to start, or just choke it and pump the gas pedal to get gas into the carb? Any thoughts on this?

    Second, the only concerning thing so far that I've encountered is the hard stop on the brake pedal when I step on the brake. The pedal goes down about an inch and then just hits a hard stop like the pedal hit a rock. No give at all. Is it possible that the master cylinder is stuck? If the wheel cylinders were leaking, etc., I would understand the pedal going to the floor, etc., but this hard stop is weird. Any recommendations on what to look at first? I really don't want to try to do a brake job at its current location. I think I can manage to get it on a trailer without brakes, but it would be nice if I had something to help stop. What would you recommend I look at first?

  2. #12
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by test1328 View Post
    I do have a couple of questions, though. When I go to start it and assuming that the starter works and it cranks the engine, would you recommend that I pour any gas or starter fluid in the carb to start, or just choke it and pump the gas pedal to get gas into the carb? Any thoughts on this?

    Second, the only concerning thing so far that I've encountered is the hard stop on the brake pedal when I step on the brake. The pedal goes down about an inch and then just hits a hard stop like the pedal hit a rock. No give at all. Is it possible that the master cylinder is stuck? If the wheel cylinders were leaking, etc., I would understand the pedal going to the floor, etc., but this hard stop is weird. Any recommendations on what to look at first? I really don't want to try to do a brake job at its current location. I think I can manage to get it on a trailer without brakes, but it would be nice if I had something to help stop. What would you recommend I look at first?
    You want to strike a balance here. You can expect the bearings are dry from sitting. Because of that it would be best if it cranked until you see oil pressure. Then I would hit it with fuel or ether. A little ether or a few tablespoons of fuel. I do not start new engines or engines that have set for a long time without priming the system. That is not saying a lot of guys just spray em' and give it a try. I have seen a lot of bad things that can occur doing that. I have also heard a lot of guys say "I did it and it worked fine." On the little 134's it is quite easy to insure the motor is primed with oil prior to a dry start. Remove the oil supply line to the filter from the block. Using a large plastic disposable veterinary syringe, pressurize the engine with oil. When you are confident you have filled the system (you should hear oil dripping back into the pan) quickly reinstall the oil line. Now give it a few cranks, no ignition and it will come up with pressure quickly and on freshly lubricated bearings. As soon as you see some pressure stop, give it some fuel or either, turn on the ignition and give it a go.

    A hard stop is usually not good. It is probably the piston frozen in the bore. Crack a bleeder and try to bleed a line. If it wont bleed when you press on the brake you found it.
    Last edited by bmorgil; 08-09-2021 at 05:27 PM.

  3. #13
    Thanks, Bmorgil. Appreciate the help and insight.

  4. #14
    OK. Here's the latest update from this past weekend. Really, was only able to spend about 2 hours on it since the rain showed up and made things difficult.

    First, on the brakes. I opened up the master cylinder and found it dry. So...I filled it up with brake fluid and let it sit for a while. After about 1 hour, I pressed on the brake pedal and finally got some movement. So, now the pedal compresses with little resistance, so at least the brake cylinder is free and moving. The bad news is the brake pedal goes all the way to the floor, so there is obviously a leak, probably many. I'm pretty sure that the wheel cylinders are leaking, so I will need to work on those at some point. I'm sure a complete brake job all the way around is in order to get things right, but that will take a bit.

    Next, I primed the engine with oil as suggested. Then I cleaned the battery connections that haven't seen a battery for over 30 years. Next, I installed the battery. I put about 5 gal of gasoline in the tank and primed the carburetor with a few ounces of gas. Now it was go time! I was pretty excited. I got a thrill when I turned the ignition key and saw the little "Amp" light on the speedometer light up. I haven't seen that in a looooong time! I cranked on the starter for a bit and saw the oil pressure rise substantially, so that was good. Then I tried to choke the carb and boy, was it hard to pull. So I oiled the choke cable at the carb and after a few pulls, it was opening and closing almost as normal. Started cranking the engine over after pumping the gas pedal lots and finally got it to turn over, but just for a few seconds. I repeatedly continued to add gas to the carb and could get the engine to run each time, but only for a few seconds and then it would die. This happened both with and without the choke engaged.

    So, my conclusion is that the engine will run if I can get the gas to the carb in sufficient supply. I'm starting to believe the carburetor is the issue and would like some input on what my next steps might be. I started pouring gas into the carb and it seemed like it would take as much as I could put in. It just drained to the bottom and where it is going, I don't know. I thought it would eventually fill up, but that never happened. Maybe my understanding of carbs is wrong on this account? I did see that there was a small amount of gas leaking out of the seal between the carb and the engine. I didn't try to tighten the nuts here since I didn't have enough time, but I don't think that is the primary problem. Is it possible the float is stuck or the jets are clogged and I need to take the carb off and do a thorough cleaning? I was never able to tell if the fuel pump was working or not either. I'd like to think the pump wouldn't go bad just sitting there, but who knows? Any other thoughts on what to do next are welcome.

    In any case, the positives are that the engine seems to be fine and operational, I've got good oil pressure, the starter works, the ignition switch works, and the brake master cylinder is working to some degree. All in all, I'm very encouraged!

  5. #15
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    That all sounds good! I think the fuel is draining out of the carb. I would plan on a rebuild kit or a rebuilt carb. Stick with the Carter carburetor.

  6. #16
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    First Start-up

    "I'm starting to believe the carburetor is the issue and would like some input on what my next steps might be. Is it possible the float is stuck or the jets are clogged and I need to take the carb off and do a thorough cleaning? I was never able to tell if the fuel pump was working or not either. I'd like to think the pump wouldn't go bad just sitting there, but who knows? Any other thoughts on what to do next are welcome."


    The first time you give an engine a whirl and it comes up - even a little bit; you want to shout “It’s alive!” Kind of like Dr. Frankenstein…

    Since it runs, you are probably in good shape for ignition components. My best guess would be a dried out, stopped up carburetor as a first guess.

    Pouring gas down a carburetor won’t fill it up. When you pour gas down the throat, it just runs through the throat and barrel down into the intake manifold. That is probably what you saw leaking out of the gasket between the carburetor and engine.

    If you’ve not played with carburetors, you have to decide what to do with the one you have.

    A. Try to rebuild it. Look on Page 192 of the 2021 KWAS catalog and you will see Master carburetor repair kits. There are a lot of little parts. You Tube and Mrs. Google will help you figure out where they go. This is the lowest dollar option, but lots of time and there is a learning experience there. And, if things don’t work after the rebuild, you always wonder if you missed something when you put things back together. BUT - the Carter YF is just about as basic as a carburetor gets and its not an impossible job if you just take your time, make a lot of pictures and lay things out in order.

    B. Put on a rebuilt carburetor. Look on Page 191. There is the SOLEX option as a low dollar choice (my opinion, a very bad option…) and the option of a rebuilt Carter (a much better option in my biased opinion). Several writers have had good luck with SOLEX units, but a lot have also said “I could have/should have had a Carter” after issues with the SOLEX.

    And, yes, fuel pumps can and will go bad after sitting in the barn for a long time. Diaphragms rupture, check valves don’t and they will get full of gunk, rust and scale and just not pump at all. You can disconnect the gas line from the carburetor, crank the engine and see if you get fuel to the carburetor inlet. (Pulling the plugs makes it spin faster and is easier on battery and starter.)

    If not, you can rig up a “gas transfusion” rig and let gas flow into the carburetor by gravity, like a Model T. Be very careful with fuel spills if you try that and don’t do it in the barn with dry hay around.

    You’re getting there and you got a lot done in just a couple of hours. Keep at it and let us know what’s the next discovery.

  7. #17
    Thanks, guys. Great advice. I think I'll try removing the gas line from the carb and see if I'm actually getting any gas to it first. That should tell me if the pump is working at least. If it isn't, then I can replace the pump and try again. If it is working, then taking the carb off and rebuilding it seems to be the way to go. I definitely want to keep the Carter YF and not try something new. I'm used to taking apart complex things, so I think I can handle the carb rebuild, but taking lots of pictures, etc. will be a priority.

  8. #18
    Senior Member TJones's Avatar
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    Test1328 you are sooo close to driving it around it sounds like!!

  9. #19
    TJones, yes! It is pretty darn exciting. Not that I'll be driving it around much at all until there is more work done on it, but I just want to get it to my garage so that the real restoration work can start. But if I can get the thing to move on its own power, that will be a huge accomplishment. Next year will mark 35 years since it was put into its current location. It would be awesome to see it move out of that spot on its own before then.

  10. #20
    Senior Member TJones's Avatar
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    It takes time and patience buddy, mine sat for almost 30 years before I drug it onto a trailer and took it to my shop then it took 3.5 to get it mobile on its own.
    It will be WELL worth the time, effort and of course the money. It will be something to be proud of especially when you do it all by yourself!!!
    Like I’ve told so many people “you came to the right place for answers”
    Between these 3 guys (gmwillys,Larrbeard and bmorgil) there is nothing they don’t know about Jeep’s and what makes em tick or tock!!!
    Last edited by TJones; 08-16-2021 at 06:32 PM.

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