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Thread: 1947 CJ2a Digging in...

  1. #11
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    Well, it sure looks like it could be a crack. I would make a WAG that the engine froze and cracked at that point. I had one engine that had frozen and the crack was down in the gallery where the distributor shaft headed down to the oil pump. There was no good way to get to that one to fix it and that block was scrap - back in 1966.

    BUT - with the brass plate and all of those screws, it may well have made a good seal - a really great farm fix! If that is the only issue, I think the patch is a better solution that trying to weld up the crack and putting heat stresses into the area.

    Let us know what you find ... we're curious too.

  2. #12
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    WOW LilWhip!!!!!! Just WOW! I have seen a lot of things, I have never seen that. Drilling all the holes definitely made the situation even worse if that's possible. LilWhip It would be a cold day in Hades before I would use that block, spend a dime on it, or the time and energy to clean it. It would need to be the last block on the planet and my life would have to depend on it.

    We were just discussing cracked blocks here on the forum a few days ago. My feelings as you can tell, are that if a block is cracked in such a way that it needs a"weld" type of repair it is not going to hold up for long. The exception is some aluminum blocks. Engine block castings can be welded or brazed and many have done it. I have seen it done a few ways, I have not seen it last for long. It does work on engines destine for High Performance short duration runs like a tractor puller. As long as they run on alcohol and don't run water in the jacket. The water jackets are usually filled with concrete. Hit the Google search for a core L134 block. You will always wonder about that crack as you motor around with your nicely rebuilt Jeep. The heating up and cooling down cycles of the engine will put a lot of stress on any kind of repair to a block casting.
    Last edited by bmorgil; 05-02-2022 at 06:09 PM.

  3. #13
    Senior Member TJones's Avatar
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    Bmorgil you are spot on!!!
    Iíve NEVER seen a repair on any type of cast block work, except on aluminum where you can heliarc it back together.
    Cast welding takes a Master to to get the temperature PERFECT to where the weld or even brazing will stick let alone hold something together.

  4. #14
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    There was a guy who wasn't the brightest bulb on the tree. He would show up to old iron tractor shows with this Allis Chalmers WD-45 that looked like was stored in the compost heap. The block was cracked from the bottom of the water jacket to darned near the head. This guy ground out the crack, drilled holes much like you see in the photos posted of the Willys block, laced the crack with copper wire, then slathered JB Weld in the cavass. He would hook up to the tractor pulling sled, and everyone would step back in case she came apart. I wish I would have taken a picture of the monstrosity.

  5. #15
    Junior Member LilWhip's Avatar
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    Yep, not super thrilled. After cleaning it up a bunch more last night, you can definitely see the repair much better. The original owner clearly ground down that area and used who knows what to patch the block. Now I have the fun job of finding a good non-cracked L134 block. They seem harder and harder to find. Any recommendations on where to look? At least I'll have fun pulling apart the engine and salvaging all of the other parts.
    IMG_1981.jpg

  6. #16
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    I was poking around Google last week and there were a few out there. eBay had a complete motor and there were some on ewillys. Hit Google hard, you will find one. You may have to ship it in, but you will probably have some good parts to sell after you take what you need.

  7. #17
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    Also look at Hobart Welders, air compressors, or generator sets of the same vintage. A lot of the Willys industrial L134 were used on those units, and generally are in descent shape. Some of the air compressors utilized the center two cylinders to compress air, while 1 and 4 were powered, so the head and intake are different.

  8. #18
    Junior Member LilWhip's Avatar
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    Thanks gmwillys! I think I may have found a really good shape hobart cj2a engine. $500! It does have one bolt snapped off in the head. Not a deal breaker I don't think.
    I better jump on it. Anything I need to be on the lookout for on the engine besides the normal wear spots below the distributor and on the head?

    272901920_4878054715590793_983198870834451107_n.jpg260017343_4424765757652280_1047716368740031926_n.jpg272957858_4868185316596386_5889297783174462896_n.jpg
    Last edited by LilWhip; 05-03-2022 at 02:38 PM.

  9. #19
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    The most common cracks are between the head stud threads and the block water jacket. Those can usually be fixed with threaded inserts. Have your machinist check it over well for cracks and thats about it. The next spot you already know about!

    Often persons will use bolts instead of studs on the head. This causes the shank of the bolt to bottom in the threaded hole of the block and crack it. Check the intake/exhaust manifold bolt holes for wear and use inserts if they are even the slightest bit loose. If the threads are too worn it is very difficult to get them to seal where they enter the water jacket. I had a heck of time with mine even though I had heli coils in the holes. If I did it again I would use threaded inserts with lots of sealant.

    Be sure to take the old block with you to the machine shop. First he can get rid of it for you and, he can verify it is the same.

  10. #20
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    A. Are those pictures of the old engine?

    B. Is it just the light, or is there something going on on the wall of #3?

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