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Thread: 1947 CJ2a Digging in...

  1. #31
    Junior Member LilWhip's Avatar
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    Okay, I picked up the industrial L134 for $500. It seems to be in really good shape other than the two snapped stud bolts in the exhaust. But those can be drilled out. Question...I have been pulling the valves on the industrial engine and they seem to be just a tiny bit longer than the valves on the L134 I pulled out of the cj2a. I am thinking they are slightly different as they are made for an industrial application. Any idea? Also, will the crankshaft or camshaft be different from my normal cj2a L134? Want to make sure I send the right parts to the machine shop

  2. #32
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    I would just use the block. Rebuild it as if it was a Willys 134. Have the shop use the WIllys parts and the new block. It is possible there are different components in the engine. If the valves are a different length, then the lifters and related valve train may also be different.

  3. #33
    Junior Member LilWhip's Avatar
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    Thanks bmorgil!

  4. #34
    Junior Member LilWhip's Avatar
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    Progress! I have the cj2a stripped down to the frame and ready to be sandblasted. The engine is also in the process of being rebuilt. Any common areas on the frame where cracking or damage occurs? I am pretty happy with the overall shape of the frame. Sorry for the picture with some of my garage junk on it.
    IMG_2151.jpg

  5. #35
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    Inspect around the front (radiator mount) cross member for rust or cracking. Look around the spring and shock mounts for cracks. Also look at the rear crossmember. All in all, the frames are pretty sturdy. Mine was used for snow plowing and everything from the front crossmember forward was roached/scabbed together. It was much easier to cut the front horns off another frame that was soft in the middle, and repair my frame, (so if you find a soft spot, don't condemn the frame).

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