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Thread: Oil filter housing

  1. #1

    Oil filter housing

    So I have the Wagon back in the garage for a few quick items, and decided to do an oil change since I'm due for one. This is my first change since I owned the Wagon.
    Looking at the outside of the oil filter housing, I notice flaking paint and a little surface rust and I figure, like all the other parts I have touched, I'll take it out and clean it up. (also its the only part that the previous owner left original blue??!!?? go figure)

    Anyway, drained the pan and pulled out the filter and there is still some oil in the housing, maybe an inch or so (hard to tell) so 2 questions.

    1. Is this indicative of some issue that I need to investigate?
    B. How do I persuade the oil out so I can take the housing off and clean/paint it?

    Thanks

    VT

  2. #2
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    Its a mess there's no way around it VT! I use the trusty veterinary syringe from the local livestock store, and a small piece of hose slipped over the needle end. Suck out all you can. From there its a paper towel wipe fest until its clean. Its not a problem, just the way they are. As long as the oil is draining back to the timing cover you are all set. There is always some left in the bottom.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    ...And to think the old technology of the filter element in a housing is coming around again on several makes of vehicles. I saw something on one of the new 1/2 ton truck diesels. The owner couldn't find the oil filter to change it. It turned out to be under the top cover of the engine, and sure enough, it was an paper element in a canister.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    Well there is less waste, you don't have the can to throw away! The good news is the new oils and engines can take a lot more miles between oil changes. At least you wont have to go after it as often.

    Its funny how often "old is new" again. I find myself saying to the younger crowd "well we had that idea years ago"!

  5. #5
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    Volvo Penta marine engines use paper elements in canisters. I think the newest one I have seen is a 2018. It was kind of strange to find it on a Chevy V8 block.
    Jeff
    '51 CJ3A
    '47 CJ2A

  6. #6
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    A Chevy with a canister filter, that takes you back to 1960! Leave it to the Swede's to stick with it if it works. In marine you can't have a failure. That no land in site thing. I have seen more than one "spin on" pop open and spray 60 psi hot oil everywhere. One quick way to dump all your oil and oil pressure.

  7. #7
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    My wife has a 2013 Buick with the 2.0L turbo. Has the paper element that's located on the top of the engine. Love it. Easy change and no mess.

  8. #8
    well, I managed to get the oil all out, I actually have a small pump that runs off a cordless drill. i forgot I had it because I never use it, it came with my boat many years ago, the prior owner used it to pump out all the oil for changes, but I find it unnecessary for that application so I don't use it.
    Once I was ready to take it all apart, I decided that it was a project for another day and just finished the oil change.

  9. #9
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    You always must have a project for another day!

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