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Thread: Resto-mod 1958 CJ5

  1. #11
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    Way safer in college with the Tacoma, especially if it is a bucket seat two door standard cab with no center console.

    I am definitely thinking a nice running V6 would be a great swap. You can only safely get so much power down in a short wheelbase high center vehicle that is not an off road racer. For a look outside the box consider a 60 degree V6. I ran one of the early Chevrolet 2.8's that later morphed into 3.9's I think. I had it in a Baja style S10. Bored to 2.9L, it made 350hp naturally aspirated. It was unique at the time and I was lucky to have a machine shop and top machinist right there. They are all around now. You need to find one for a rear wheel drive. The 60 degree V6 allows an enormous amount of room. It would fit well and you would still be able to get to everything in the engine house. A modern 60 degree with a turbo or better yet a low profile roots or a Centrifugal Supercharger would be the ticket! Hahah, now there's a thought.

    Here's TJ's nice "Orange Crush" V6 Jeep.
    https://willysjeepforum.kaiserwillys...-Forum/page108
    Last edited by bmorgil; 07-31-2023 at 06:24 PM.

  2. #12
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    So next question is what is a price range you would expect pay for this restomod? How exactly does restomodding work?

  3. #13
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    Whenever you "mod" a vehicle, the value is in the eye of the purchaser. That is why most 'Mod's" are sold at auction where buyers can get a good look at the workmanship and style. If you were to put a value on it, you would start with what cost you have in it and what your labor is worth.

  4. #14
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    In just about any restoration or resto-mod, you will never, financially, recover the cost of the job if you resell it. The value is in the project itself.

    There is no way we can estimate what a resto-mod would cost. It depends on your local market, the mods you are making and how much work you can do yourself or get friends to help with.

    Just one rough estimate - about 30% to 50% (or more) that you thought it would cost.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarrBeard View Post
    In just about any restoration or resto-mod, you will never, financially, recover the cost of the job if you resell it. The value is in the project itself.

    There is no way we can estimate what a resto-mod would cost. It depends on your local market, the mods you are making and how much work you can do yourself or get friends to help with.

    Just one rough estimate - about 30% to 50% (or more) that you thought it would cost.
    Looking at engines so far Iím thinking the cost of parts will be near $15K. Resale value isnít anything Iím considering. I have no skills to do anything on the project myself. I imagine labor would get it up to $30K.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmorgil View Post
    Like gm said, you can put a lot of different engines in there. You may want to stick with a V6 if you are looking for something that will be easy to fit with plenty of power. Check out TJ's CJ for a nice hot rod street Jeep CJ. The Suspension, Transfer Case, Transmission and Axles will have no problem with whatever you decide to use for an engine.

    https://willysjeepforum.kaiserwillys...-Forum/page108
    TJ seems like a great guy, being a Buckeye fan and all. I'd love to see a parts list (under the hood and suspension) and ask him what he thinks would be good in mine.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmorgil View Post
    Way safer in college with the Tacoma, especially if it is a bucket seat two door standard cab with no center console.

    I am definitely thinking a nice running V6 would be a great swap. You can only safely get so much power down in a short wheelbase high center vehicle that is not an off road racer. For a look outside the box consider a 60 degree V6. I ran one of the early Chevrolet 2.8's that later morphed into 3.9's I think. I had it in a Baja style S10. Bored to 2.9L, it made 350hp naturally aspirated. It was unique at the time and I was lucky to have a machine shop and top machinist right there. They are all around now. You need to find one for a rear wheel drive. The 60 degree V6 allows an enormous amount of room. It would fit well and you would still be able to get to everything in the engine house. A modern 60 degree with a turbo or better yet a low profile roots or a Centrifugal Supercharger would be the ticket! Hahah, now there's a thought.

    Here's TJ's nice "Orange Crush" V6 Jeep.
    https://willysjeepforum.kaiserwillys...-Forum/page108
    So the 60 degree V6 for RWD can also do 4WD? What trans would you recommend for that setup? And if turbo, etc, what suspension components? Iím all ears and since I havenít paid yet Iíve got more money than sense.

  8. #18
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    The reasoning for the RWD for the selection of a 60-degree V6 is that there are two versions of the engine. A front wheel drive V6 is transverse mounted and is set up for that purpose. The rear wheel drive will be much easier to use for your purpose, because it is set up to work in your application without major modifications in how everything hooks up. It just saves you a boat load of money and time to start with a RWD variant. From there, your options open up again for what you may like to run, then also to what transfer case you would like. Advanced Adapters or Novack has a whole slew of options to what you could put together to make your driveline unite together.

  9. #19
    Senior Member TJones's Avatar
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    First things first Welcome Jafopt!!!!
    Where are you located in Ohio?
    It might be a lot simpler to meet up and show and tell
    I’m north of Akron a little.
    That’s a Sweet and Very clean CJ-5 you are getting
    WOW not many left in that good of shape!!!

  10. #20
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    If you are serious, there are a few shops in the U.S. that will deliver your dream to you. Hogan Built in Arizona is an example of what I would consider one of the premium shops in the U.S.. It simply does not get any better than his work. You need to find a shop like this that can deliver your dream. Where are you located? If you are serious about it, you need to find a shop. Here is an example of in my opinion, one of the best. A recent build sold at auction for over a half a million dollars.

    https://hoganbuilt.com/


    Known for their custom Chevrolet Blazers, this shop gives you an idea of who is out there building. You need to ask for a shop that will take on your project. Cost should not be your first question. Everyone does not have the skills, time or shop to build custom vehicles. It certainly doesn't mean those persons don't appreciate and drive them. I have worked with custom shops across the country. There are some premium shops out there. The best ones cost accordingly and take their time. In the end I have seen custom built vehicles like you are contemplating sell for $500,000 or more at auction. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. The work required takes skill, sweat, engineering help, and expensive parts. The labor and skill are the most expensive.

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