Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 42

Thread: Oil system restoring

  1. #11
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Northwestern Ohio
    Posts
    3,761
    The original owner on mine modified about everything. Here is his filter "relocation". That is the original canister mounted on the drivers fender.

  2. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    17
    Okay so, update on my work here. I replaced the oil canister and oil inlet/outlet hoses, but still having some issues.

    Within 5 minutes of running the Jeep for the first time since the work, oil started spewing out of the top of the oil canister where the top bolt meets the cap. It was PLENTY torqued on, is it possible that I had it on too tight?

    Attachment 11601

    Can someone explain how the oil reaches the outlet hose exactly? The inlet hose goes in on the top side of the can, then oil passes through the filter, then just goes out the bottom? Is there supposed to be much pressure in the oil canister or is the oil leaving the canister being pulled by the vacuum from the timing gear cover?

    I had some issues with the hose fitting into the timing cover spot. Without removing the timing cover, the threads do not appear to be stripped, but when I try to put the hose on, only about 1 thread goes on and it starts stripping. I thought it was because of the flare on the one side of the outlet hose meeting the other flare on the timing cover preventing it from being able to be torqued on further. So I went to a hydraulic hose company and got a hose and 2 adapters made (the adapter that goes into the timing cover had a more shallow but wider flare to it, thinking I could seat it on more. This still didn't work, so I used some teflon tape to at least get it seated on. Could this be a reason the oil is not returning as quickly as it should back to the engine (Not enough vacuum pull?).

    Attachment 11602

    I guess my last option is to pull the timing cover off and look at it more closely, maybe even have to get a replacement altogether?

    If it comes to that, are there any tricks to getting that cover off, or is it straightforward when I get my hands in there?

    Thanks all!

  3. #13
    Senior Member 56willys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2023
    Location
    Northwestern PA.
    Posts
    311
    The bolt on the canister lid, should have a rubber grommet/washer. On my engine before I changed canister seals it had enough pressure to push oil through around the lid. Redneck oil pressure guage!

  4. #14
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    3,734
    It looks like you may have the wrong thread pitch on the hose end causing you the problem, since your old hose was properly seated. I know that there have been some issues in the past with the hoses not being to print, and folks have had to have custom hoses made. There were some durability issues, but I do not recall if there were any issues with the thread. Hopefully Bmorgil or LarrBeard will chime in to refresh our memory.

    The engine oil pressure pushes the oil into the top of the filter assembly, then it siphons through the filter media, then drains back down to the front cover. No vacuum or wizardry to how the oil gets cycled through, just engine oil pressure.

  5. #15
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Northwestern Ohio
    Posts
    3,761
    There is a gasket under the bolt. It is a tricky one as you can see from the copy of a post below from my thread on peeJ. The threads on the timing cover should be an inverted flare fitting. The threads on the canister should be pipe. Originally there were no adapters used. Of course someone could have changed things! The filter is a simple bleed off system. It allows a controlled Pressure leak from the block to fill the canister. It is under pressure. There is a small orifice in the cover fitting that controls the drain back speed into the block. The oil drains back slowly.


    Massive Oil Leak at the Filter Canaster!


    I was reading a post by LarrBeard regaling us in the tale of his beautiful truck spraying oil all over his engine compartment. I thought to myself what a terrible thing to happen to such a like new super clean engine compartment. A "baptism by fire". Then I decided to dry up my last little issues with my oil lines and change out the filter for the first time since the restore. A whopping 150 miles on it. All went smooth. I had and have had trouble with that copper gasket under the filter canister bolt. The copper requires a lot of force to make it seal and a used one will never seal well. I do not like applying a lot of torque to that bolt. I have used composites but I could not come up with one "FAST ENOUGH". Oh the cost of that!

    I decided to fabricate one out of some thick soft gasket material. It didn't work. Took it for a 2 mile spin. Pumped 1/2 of a quart of oil onto the underside of the hood, all over the distributor, Alternator various other parts. I got back from the ride only to see massive oil dripping from the front of the jeep to the back. Amazing the mess that causes.

    Spending the day taking things apart and cleaning it all back up. Well it needed a good "dusting off" after the winter! And of course the first show of the year not cancelled due to COVID is Tuesday! I will be taking apart and cleaning for the next 2 days. I went to the Auto parts store looking for a "Willys A-1233 Gasket" for the cover bolt. On line https://www.rfjp.com/p-131-oil-filte...ket-a1233.aspx But I wanted it now and not copper! It is a 7/16" I.D. x 1" O.D. gasket. I found several assortments. I bought them all. Here we go again.

    DA#@ IT!!!!!

  6. #16
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    17
    The bolt that came with my new canister has a copper crush ring, and some sort of hard rubber or even plastic washer under that. It looks like it would be plenty fortified to prevent any leaking from coming up through. With how tight I originally had it on there, the rate it was flowing out just didn't make sense to me unless it was under extreme pressure. I got all my parts from Kaiser Willys, so I used all the adapters and hoses included.

    So, for them to have sent me 2 oil outlet hoses, and neither one is going into the timing cover threads properly, I don't know. I tried screwing in several bolts of various sizes, threads, pitches, etc and all of them had the same issue where they'd only go in a little bit before stripping. Just doesn't make sense to me that nothing wants to go in there.

    So let me ask this, how imperatively tight or snug does that oil outlet hose have to be in the timing cover? It sounds like its just there to direct the flow of oil back into the crankcase very low pressure. So until I find a better solution or remove the timing cover altogether, would it be OK to run in the meantime, provided I figure out the oil canister leak? (FYI This Jeep doesn't leave my farm property, it only gets used like an ATV and driven around for work and maintenance/pleasure riding.

    Also, the hydraulic hose shop did provide me with an inverted flare fitting, which is the one attached to the hose in my picture. It's just that it doesn't want to thread in. It's like 1mm too thin or has slightly wider spacing or something. I couldn't imagine this being a metric size but maybe something got warped along the years?

  7. #17
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Northwestern Ohio
    Posts
    3,761
    It is under engine oil pressure. A max of around 40 PSI or so. If it is not a good tight fit it will leak. If it is not solidly attached it will blow off and dump all the oil in a minute. The copper crush washer is the correct one. It needs to be new and tight. I have had zero luck using them twice.

    It sounds like something is wrong with the threads in the cover. The KW hose should thread in and seal in to the cover.

    The torque spec is a "crush" on the canister bolt. You tighten it down snug, then rotate it about another 1/4 turn or so until you are sure you are crushing the copper washer. It is tight. This is the same as the copper washers used on brakes. They will seal a lot of pressure but they must be crushed slightly. Not so smashed they split, but make no mistake it is tight.

    It is a Willys part number A-1233

    https://www.rfjp.com/p-131-oil-filte...ket-a1233.aspx

    It is 7/16" I.D. x 1" O.D.
    Last edited by bmorgil; 05-13-2024 at 04:31 PM.

  8. #18
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    17
    Okay I'll double check. I had it cranked down a lot so it just didn't make sense to me that oil would spill out there.

    Anything I should know when removing the timing cover? Secret to getting that main pulley off or is it straightforward? I haven't looked at it closely enough to see what tools will be needed.

  9. #19
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Northwestern Ohio
    Posts
    3,761
    After my oil disaster, I always install a new copper washer, tighten it down and fie it up. If it leaks I tighten till it stops.

    A standard Harmonic Balancer puller will take the balancer off. There is one "trick" to getting the front Crank Seal lined up when you reinstall. Be sure you install the Harmonic Balancer, with an install tool, before you tighten the attaching bolts. Leave them very loose until the balancer is on and is centering itself. Then tighten the cover down alternating the pastern and tightening in a few increments. Use a little dab of silicone on the corners.

  10. #20
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by bmorgil View Post
    After my oil disaster, I always install a new copper washer, tighten it down and fie it up. If it leaks I tighten till it stops.

    A standard Harmonic Balancer puller will take the balancer off. There is one "trick" to getting the front Crank Seal lined up when you reinstall. Be sure you install the Harmonic Balancer, with an install tool, before you tighten the attaching bolts. Leave them very loose until the balancer is on and is centering itself. Then tighten the cover down alternating the pastern and tightening in a few increments. Use a little dab of silicone on the corners.
    Hmm that's something I'm not familiar with at all. Maybe I can just try to get a closer look at the threads and match it up with a bolt first and see if I can't make the existing threads work a bit better.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •