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Thread: Welders and Welding

  1. #21
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    On my old derby car radiators, I would fix cracks or all out holes by brazing. My favorite fit all radiator was twisted 4" bottom corner to top corner. It took a hit to where the top nipple was pushed through the front of the tank. It took some doing, but I saved the nipple and fixed the hole in the front of the tank and the cracking around the back side. After squaring the tanks back out in a press, I pressure tested it to 15 psi, and didn't have any leaks. In the case of the side mounts, I would follow Bmorgil's suggestion and soldier the straps back into place with the 50/50 acid core. As far as stainless, you do have to pump argon in the tubing to be successful. I just did a quick and dirty on my headers since I was given the material the night before the run. I wasn't 100 percent certain that the MIG would penetrate enough to be good. The photo above was the prior to the third run with them installed. The heavy wall pipe didn't change color much with the heat cycles.

  2. #22
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    Should've clarified on the stainless welding it depends on what you're trying to achieve. If you're building a project and the metal just happens to be stainless, you can weld it with a variety of methods and materials. For example, most stainless can be welded to typical steel with the same mig wire and shielding gas used for non-stainless materials......... However, be aware the weld area will rust. If you want to join stainless to stainless and retain the stainless quality of corrosion resistance it will require stainless wire same alloy as what you're welding. With the hassle associated with changing mig wire, I avoid that process by keeping some stainless electrodes for the stick welder and use it on those occasions.

    On the radiator issue, another consideration might be epoxy to affix the mounting bracket.

  3. #23
    Senior Member 56willys's Avatar
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    Thanks guys, this is why i asked before starting to heat up the radiator. Should have asked before I bought the brazing rod. I'll have to get some solder and do it that way. I got the brazing rod thinking it would be stronger, never even dawned on me that it would require more heat. The last thing I want to do is have to order a new radiator, so you guys saved a few hundred bucks, thanks again.

  4. #24
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    I thought I would post pictures of flux core vs. gas shielded wire feed welding. The welds in both pictures show the welder doesn’t really have a clue but they were both done with the same machine set up for the same thickness material. Flux core wire was .035 and the solid was .030. Neither have had the brush put to them.

    IMG_5224.jpg

    IMG_5225.jpg
    Jeff
    '51 CJ3A
    '47 CJ2A

  5. #25
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    The gas shield was definitely cleaner.

  6. #26
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    Yes sir, there is a big difference in the gas shield. Thank you CJ3 for showing the difference.

  7. #27
    Super Moderator LarrBeard's Avatar
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    "The welds in both pictures show the welder doesn’t really have a clue... "

    I would take issue with that. The welder does have a clue - he knows he is new to the art and he is asking good questions, experimenting and learning from both his successes and not so great efforts. That's having a real clue instead of doing the same thing over and over with bad results.

    So there - haruumph.

  8. #28
    Super Moderator gmwillys's Avatar
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    Good point LarrBeard, even the most seasoned welder has off days. The environment plays a factor too. Since my shop is limited in indoor size, I often have wind issues. Even with wind breaks, a pesky breeze will torment my quality. There is a solution for that, but I don't see the immediate need to go to a dual shield set up.

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