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Thread: Cruising speed???

  1. #11
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    Hopefully you can locate the ratio tag on the rear axle. There may still be the original tag indicating the ratio in place. It could be a 5.38 or a 4.88. The tag was located under one of the rear cover bolts on the axle housing. It was usually the lower right corner but it could be under any one of them. If all else fails just jack it up and put it in neutral. Rotate the driveshaft and count the rotations to make the tire turn one complete revolution.

    Here is a good calculator from the tech library on this site:

    https://willysjeepforum.kaiserwillys...e-speed-at-RPM

  2. #12
    Junior Member
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    Aug 2020
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    I have a 1961 cj5 134 Hurricane engine. Max speed 59 MPH.
    When timing , I had a carburetor rebuilder sent me a paper on how to time them with out a light. He said back in the 60's gas octane was a lot lower then it is now and the timing marks were set for that.
    He said warm the engine up, go to the exhaust pipe and put your hand up to it. It should be smooth exhaust flow, if you feel pops advance the timing until it is a smooth flow.
    Believe me it works! The 134 has a long stroke piston and you get the complete burn of fuel this way.

  3. #13
    Super Moderator bmorgil's Avatar
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    Beef, I have seen and heard a lot of "ways" to time an engine. The method you have described is not one I would recommend however. There are a few issues with doing it that way and none of them are good. If you are looking for better performance you can achieve a very slight increase by running a few more degrees of timing. For the most part you are not going to get much more. The inherent low compression of the Willys and the increase in today's octane levels will allow a lot more timing without detonation. This does not correlate to more power or a better running engine however. The only place to really see power increases by advancing the timing would be best done on a chassis or engine dynamometer. You could do some serious damage if you increase the timing to far at idle and cause the total timing to be too much. The best total timing is a function of peak power at peak loads at a given RPM.

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